Don’t be like this squirrel

  ENGLISH 12 
FALL 2019 WORKBOOK

TEXTBOOK ASSIGNMENTS/ PARTIAL SEMESTER AGENDA

COURSE TEXTBOOK

Literature: The British Tradition, Pub. Prentice Hall

COURSE READING

The Canterbury Tales, by Geoffrey Chaucer

22 Great Jobs for People Who Love to Travel (Internet Access Only)

https://www.businessnewsdaily.com/2389-jobs-travel-lovers.html

The Tell-Tale Heart, by Edgar Allen Poe

CHAUCER VIDEOS

The Canterbury Tales: Prologue

The Canterbury Tales:  The Pardoner’s Tale

The Canterbury Tales: The Wife of Bath’s Tale

COURSE FEATURE MOVIES

Beowulf

Arrival

Wild Horse, Wild Ride

SONG ANALYSIS

Fast Car – Tracy Chapman                             

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DwrHwZyFN7M&pbjreload=10

Isn’t She Lovely – Stevie Wonder

Mind Playing Tricks On Me  – Geto Boys:         

WAR SONG ANALYSIS

The Band Played Waltzing Matilda – John McDermott

If I Die Before You Wake  Tribute to Armed Forces

CAREER VIDEO CLIPS

Animated History of Work         

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yBgKkYcoPgM

Things to Know After High School

Don’t follow your Passion.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MKlx1DLa9EA]

Body language, the power is in the palm of your hands

Economic Policy Institute looking at Native American employment.

Microphone Manufacturing in the Navajo Nation 

Your phone is trying to control your life

  

Truth About Smartphone Addiction

  

INSTANT VIDEO CREDIT

GEORGIA VIDEO

The Trader – Netflix

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Monday January 7 – Friday January 11

Monday Jan 7    Teachers Return – Full Day Professional Training

Tues. Jan 8        Students Return / Student Interviews

Weds. Jan 9       Review Syllabus/Rules/Teaching & Class Management Style

Write and Display Class & Student Semester Goals

Thurs. Jan 10     LOGICAL FALLACIES/PERSUASION

REVIEW TEXTBOOK FORMAT/ JOINT TEXTBOOK WORK

Fri. Jan 11          REVIEW PERSUASION

STUDY FOR VOCAB TEST 1

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OLD ENGLISH AND MEDIEVAL PERIODS+  

Monday January 14 – Friday January 18    

Mon. Jan 14        Snapshot                                      p 2                 

Mon. Jan 14        The Seafarer                       pp 20-29         Q 1, 2 & 3

Tues Jan 15       Vocab – Detriment; Dexterous; Discretion; Facetious; Gregarious etc. Story/Script Exercise.

Weds Jan 16      Media Literacy

MEDIA LITERACY BASIC QUESTION

What is “the media”?; What is “mass media”?; Why should you care?; How is media content (news reports, entertainment, infotainment etc) delivered to audiences these days?

PHONE ADDICTION/MANIPULATION VIDEOS – Is your cell phone controlling your mind?

VIDEO 1Your phone is trying to control your life

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MacJ4p0vITM

What are the main points of VIDEO 1?;  Summarize VIDEO 1; How did you find this video useful? Explain.

VIDEO 2 – Truth About Smartphone Addiction

https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=9&v=I2f-YNvRjIU  

What are the main points of VIDEO 2?;  Summarize VIDEO 2; How did you find this video useful? Explain.

GROUP DISCUSSIONS: Do you mind being spied on and having your brain  chemistry manipulated by big businesses – through your phone and other electronic appliances – every second of every day of your life? 

Thurs Jan 17      The Secret Life of Walter Mitty, by James Thurber CP 18

Fri. Jan 18          14 Tips for Writing a Rockstar Resume CP 01

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Monday January 21 – Friday January 25

Mon. Jan 21        NO SCHOOL MLK DAY

Tues Jan 22       Vocab – Optimum; Ostentatious; Scrupulous; Sensory; Vicarious

Weds Jan 23      James Joyce                                p 1235

Weds Jan 23      Araby                           pp 1237-1241       Q 1, 2 & 3

Thurs Jan 24      The Tell-Tale Heart by Edgar Allen Poe – CP 02

Fri. Jan 25          Teen Interview Questions    

1.  REVIEW JOB INTERVIEW TIPS

2.  WRITE DOWN YOUR RESPONSES TO THE INTERVIEW QUESTIONS

3.  PAIR UP AND INTERVIEW EACH OTHER USING QUESTIONS BELOW.

 Teen Job Interview Questions

When you are a teen preparing for a job interview, it can be helpful to review typical interview questions that you will most likely be asked. Reviewing answers as well can help you come up with your own responses. Take the time to personalize your answers so they reflect you, as a person and as a candidate for employment.

Why Are You Looking for a Job? – Of course, everyone wants to make money at a job, but the reasons you should share with a potential employer should reflect your interest in the field, or in helping to develop your skill set.

Why Are You Interested in Working for Our Company? – Employers ask this question to gauge your interest in the field, and to see if you have done your research. Make sure you check out the company’s website at the very least, and familiarize yourself with what the company does, what the work and the work culture are like, and what’s important to them.

How Has School Prepared You For Working at Our Company? – Here is your opportunity to talk about the skills you have gained in your education that will make you an ideal candidate for the position.

Why Should We Hire You? – New hires take time to train, and the company wants to know you are worth it. Let them know about your interest in contributing to the company immediately, and be sure to mention if you think they are a firm you would like to consider when your studies are complete.

What Do You Think It Takes to be Successful in This Position? – The job posting can be very helpful in letting you know how they will want you to answer this question. Let them know about the skills you have that they are looking for.

How Would You Describe Your Ability To Work as a Team Member? – There have likely been many times you have worked as a team, on projects, in sports or while volunteering.

The interviewer will want to hear a specific example of a time you worked successfully in a team situation.

What Has Been Your Most Rewarding Accomplishment? – You don’t want to brag, but you should share an accomplishment that relates to some of the qualities or experiences required for the job you’re interviewing for.

What Are Your Salary Expectations? – With this question, the employer is trying to establish that your expectations are reasonable. As a young worker, the salary you are offered will probably align with an entry level position. It’s usually best to avoid a specific number, unless you know for a fact what the job pays.

Tell Me About a Major Problem you Recently Handled. – With this question, the interviewer is trying to determine how skilled you are at problem solving. It’s fine to use an example from school, work, sports or volunteering. Make sure you show a positive resolution.

Have You Ever Had Difficulty With a Supervisor or Teacher? – The interviewer will ask this question to determine how you relate to authority. Always answer honestly, but make sure that you have a positive outcome. Remember that the most difficult situations are sometimes the best learning experiences.

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Monday January 28 – Friday February 1

Mon. Jan 28       Snapshot                                                 p 39

Mon. Jan 28       What is considered to be a TEXT?

What is the MAIN IDEA of a text?

How do you identify the MAIN IDEA(s) of a text?

What is a SUMMARY of a text?

Tues Jan 29       Vocab Test 1 Word Jumble  [CP 17]

Weds Jan 30      Rupert Brooke                              p 1273

                           The Soldier                                             p 1275       Q 1, 2 & 3

WATCH: The Band Played Waltzing Matilda                                  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VktJNNKm3B0

WATCH:  If I Die Before You Wake Tribute to Armed Forces

In-Class Exercise:  Respond to the following questions on the two songs you just heard by addressing the following questions.

1.  What your gut reaction to each song was.

2.  What the main idea being presented in each song is.

3.  What the main arguments being made in each song are.

4.  How each of the three appealsLogos,(reason) Pathos, (emotion), and Ethos, (authority) – are being used in making those arguments for each song.

Try to support what you write with evidence from the song.

Thurs Jan 31       Read and respond to essay calling for abolition of senior        year CP 03

Fri. Feb 1            Finish Reading and response to senior year essay

                           Catch-up time for the week.

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Monday February 4 – Friday February 8

Mon Feb 4          About/ From Beowulf                     pp 40-64         Q 1a, 2 & 5

Mon Feb 4          WATCH: Beowulf

Tues Feb 5                  WATCH: Beowulf                          Respond to Prompt

IN PAIRS (One grade per pair.): Write a one-page summary of Beowulf the movie.  Be sure to identify the main ideas presented in the movie. Identify the main points by UNDERLINING or using different color ink. Note any differences you noticed between the movie version and the textbook version of the text.

NOTE:  If you did not see the movie, summarize the written version in the green textbook.

Weds Feb 6         Vocab – Ambiguous; Dissident; Embellish; Fritter; Inadvertent

Thurs Feb 7        Elements of Persuasive Essay – CP 04

                                    What is persuasion?

What is point of view? – CP 05 (“Looting/GI and kids pic)

Difference between building and argument and having an argument

  • Appropriate topic selection
    • Any potential topic for an argument essay should be current, debatable, researchable and manageable.
      • Create a clear, firm, and debatable thesis
      • Provide the necessary background information on the topic
      • Focus on organization and transitions
      • Perform effective and thorough research
      • Incorporate appeals to logos, pathos, and ethos. Logos
      • Avoid using logical fallacies
      • Solid outline
      • Peer review

Choose topic for in-class persuasive essay        

                        Start working on thesis statement

Fri. Feb 8            Finish working on thesis statement

                           Brainstorm

Create outline

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Monday February 11 – Friday February 15

Mon Feb 11        Read and Respond to “F Word” Essay.  CP 06

Tues Feb 12       Vocab – Collaborate; Despondent; Instigate; Resilient; Retrospect; Inane; Juxtapose; Lethargy; Sporadic; Subsidize

Tues Feb 12       Finish Response to “F Word” Essay

Weds Feb 13      George Orwell                     p 1317

Weds Feb 13      Shooting an Elephant           pp 1318-1326     Q 1 & 2

Thurs Feb 14      WATCH:  Wild Horse, Wild Ride

Fri. Feb 15          WATCH:  Wild Horse, Wild Ride   

                           In-Class Responses

1.  What is the main idea behind this documentary?

2.  Write a summary of this documentary?

3.  Is this documentary trying to persuade you to do or think anything? If so, what?

4.  What part of this documentary made you feel a particular emotion?

5.  What emotion did you feel?

6.  How did the documentary content make you feel that emotion?

7.  What part of this documentary made you think logically?         (more)

8.  How did the relevant part of the documentary content make you think logically?

9.  What kind of audience would this documentary most appeal to and why?

____________________________________________________________

Monday February 18 – Friday February 22

Mon Feb 18        NO SCHOOL   PRESIDENT’S DAY

Tues Feb 19     VOCAB TEST 1

Weds Feb 20      Doris Lessing                               p 1327

Weds Feb 20      No Witchcraft for Sale           pp 1328-1336   Q 1, 2 & 3

Thurs Feb 21      Start writing persuasive essay

Fri. Feb 22          Finish writing persuasive essay

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Monday February 25 – Friday March 1

Mon Feb 25        A History of the English              pp 84-88

Tues Feb 26       Vocab – Maudlin; Regress; Relinquish; Ubiquitous; Zenith; Hoist; Illicit; Irrevocable; Precipitate; Proliferation

Weds Feb 27      Anita Desai                          p 1419

Weds Feb 27      A Devoted Son            pp 1420-1429         Q 1, 2, 3a & 4a

Thurs Feb 28      WATCH:  Macbeth

Fri.  Mar 1           WATCH:  Macbeth

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Monday March 4 – Friday March 8

Mon. Mar 4         Church and People                pp 84-88                 Q 1 & 2

Mon. Mar 4         Chaucer’s World                    pp 90-91

Tues Mar 5         Vocab – Berate; Estrange; Euphoric; Impetuous; Infallible; Charlatan; Corroborate; Diverge; Disseminate; Dormant

Weds Mar 6         Grammar                  

                                     Writing a complete sentence

A. Identify the following phrases as being a sentence fragment, a complete sentence, or a run-on sentence, and explain your response.

                                                                                                                    Fragment                                                                                                               Complete                    Run-on

  1. My fingers felt like ice cubes…………………………………………………………………………………….
  2. Spicy salsa…………………………………………………………………………………………………..
  3. I bought soda you bought soda……………………………………………………………………………….
  4. The cake had icing and sprinkles it was so sweet…………………………………………………………..
  5. The colorful peacocks ran across the street……………………………………………………………………
  6. The pine cones were heavy with snow they fell………………………………………………………………..
  7. My tea kettle boiled over……………………………………………………………………………………
  8. Made snowman………………………………………………………………………………………………
  9. Because it was so cold outside……………………………………………………………………………….
  10. Ran into me……………………………………………………………………………………………………

B.  Come up with a creative way to turn the sentence fragments and run-on sentences into complete sentences.

C. Common language mistakes and confusions

QUIZ 1.  Is this your/you’re book?;   2.  My dog is cuter then/than your dog:   3.  Every dog has its/it’s day. 4.  Please accept/except my apologies;  5. Their/There/They’re house is bigger then/than yours;    6. We would of/would have won if we tried harder.   7.  We’re going to/too the park!   8. The principal’s/principle’s absence won’t affect/effect graduation celebrations.   9. This is our/are time to shine.  10.  The quarter back passed/past the ball to his wide receiver.   11.  Whose/who’s fault is that?!   12.  Your/You’re really going to do that?  13. First eat your dinner then/than you can have desert.   14.  Its/It’s a beautiful day!   15.  Everyone accept/except Mary showed up to the meeting.    16.  Their/ There/They’re are many reasons why she won the race.  17.  Their/There/They’re the kindest people I’ve ever met.  18. There are just to/too many cooks in this kitchen.  19. Honest people live according to ethical principals/principles.  20. Our/Are we there yet?!  21. It’s well passed/past his bedtime.  22. You’re the one whose/who’s going to benefit.   23. Please take your/you’re time.

Thurs Mar 7        Cinderella, by the Brothers Grimm – CP 07

Fri. Mar 8            Finish Cinderella responses

WATCH VIDEO CLIPHistory of Work https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yBgKkYcoPgM

____________________________________________________________

Monday March 11 – Friday March 15

Mon. Mar 11       Chaucer: Meet the Author           pp 92-93

Mon. Mar 11       Canterbury Tales Prologue            pp 96-119       

Tues Mar 12   VOCAB TEST 2

Weds Mar 13      Arthur C. Clarke                                    p 1445

Weds Mar 13      from We’ll Never Conquer

         Space                                   pp1446-1451  Q 1 & 2

Thurs Mar 14      WATCH:  Arrival

Fri. Mar 15          WATCH:  Arrival                  

            In-Class Responses

1.  What are the main ideas expressed in the movie?

2.  What evidence can you point to in the movie that support the claim that they are main ideas?

3.  Write a brief summary of Arrival.

4.  What communications problems did the humans and the aliens have to overcome in Arrival?

5.  Give examples from the movie of how they overcame these problems.

6.  What similar communications problems do humans have with each other?

7.  How would you suggest that we overcome those problems?

____________________________________________________________

SPRING BREAK

(March 18 – 22)

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Monday March 25 – Friday March 29

Mon. Mar 25     DEADLINE: TAKE-HOME MIDTERM TEST DUE

Mon. Mar 25       Canterbury Tales Prologue            pp 96-119       

Tues. Mar 26      Canterbury Tales Prologue            pp 96-119   Q  1, 2 & 3

Tues. Mar 26      The Pardoner’s Tale               pp 124-134         Q  1, 2 & 4

Weds Mar 27        WATCH: The Pardoner’s Tale    Main Point/Summary etc

Weds Mar 27         WATCH: The Wife of Bath’s Tale Main Point/Sum. etc

Weds Mar 27         The Wife of Bath’s Tale      pp 138-150   Q 1, 2a & 3a, 3b

Thurs Mar 28      Chaucer Catch-Up Class/Vocab

Thurs Mar 28      SPOOF SUMMER HOLIDAY ESSAY – CP 08

Fri. Mar 29          Connotation and Denotation – CP 09

Fri. Mar 29                   WATCH:  Things to Know After High School

In-Class Responses

A:                     1. What’s your favorite piece of advice offered and why?

2. Which, if any, pieces of advice do you think you’ll take to heart? Explain.

B:                     Write an estimated monthly budget for leaving home and moving into your own accommodation (with or without a roommate) and for supporting yourself.

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ENGLISH RENAISSANCE  

        

Monday April 1 – Friday April 5

Mon. April 1        Snapshot                                       p 236

Mon. April 1        Life in Elizabethan…England                 pp 248-249

Mon. April 1        The Passionate Shepherd             p …266

Mon. April 1        The Nymph’s Reply …          pp 268-269       Q 1, 2 & 3

Tues April 2        Vocab/Open Study

Weds April 3                IN-CLASS WRITING EXERCISE

PART 1:     Write an honest SELF EVALUATION of your personal growth and performance thus far, both as a STUDENT GENERALLY and in this ENGLISH CLASS. Specifically address each of the following categories listed below, even if only to say the category doesn’t apply to you. (Explain why it doesn’t apply to you.) Please write your answers answer in the form of a LIST.

Please assess:

  1. Your record thus far of turning in written work in on time.
    1. Your attendance and tardiness.
    1. The level of quality of your work.
    1. The amount of effort you put into producing high-quality work.
    1. How well you pay attention in the classroom
    1. Your classroom behavior and the level of respect and consideration you show to  others in the classroom.
    1. The ways in which you can improve
      1. the quality of your work,
      1. your level of attention, and
      1. your behavior in class.
    1. How well you have risen to the task of maturing to become an independent and mature young adult, prepared to leave the protection of school and to enter the real world, in which you will have to face many challenges and make many decisions alone.
    1. Any challenges that you are facing to make the transition from a high school student to being an independent adult, and what you are doing to overcome those challenges.
    1. Anything else you want to share.

PART 2: Please finish your response by clearly listing the following:

  • What final grade you want to get in this English class
    • What final grade you think you deserve in this English class.
    • What final grade you expect you will actually get in this English class

Thurs April 4       Read the accompanying Washington Post article: The troubling case of the young Japanese reporter who worked herself to death – CP 10 — and then answer the following questions:

1.  What’s your gut response to the information in the article? Explain.

2.  What is the main point being made in the article, and how do you know this?

3.  What does the article tell the reader about Japanese workplace culture? Give examples to support your response.

4.  What do you think is an acceptable amount of overtime to be worked each month?  Explain.

5.  Can you ever see yourself working yourself to death because of peer pressure, because of fear of losing your job, or because you want to impress your employer? Explain.

6.  Would you feel comfortable telling an employer that you couldn’t work overtime if it meant you might lose a job you loved?  Explain.

Fri. April 5           Aptitude Testing – CP 11

____________________________________________________________

Monday April 8 – Friday April 12 

Mon. April 8        Defining Drama                            pp 308-309

Mon. April 8        Shakespeare’s World                           pp 312-313

Tues April 9        Snapshot                                       p 1122

Tues April 9        Joseph Conrad                            p 1219                  

Weds. April 10    The Lagoon                          pp 1220-1234   Q 1 & 2

Thurs April 11     Gun Control Argument/Reading – CP 12

Fri. April 12                  Finish Gun Control/Reading Exercise

50% Grade Firing Article CP 13

____________________________________________________________

THE 17th AND 18th CENTURY+  

Monday April 15 – Friday April 19

Mon. April 15      Snapshot                                       p 464

Mon. April 15      Milton’s World                                pp 516-517

Mon. April 15      John Milton                                  pp 518-519

Tues April 16      Review words for Vocab Test 3

Weds April 17     REVIEW Elements of a Story      

Setting Character(s) Theme Plot  Conflict Tone  Climax Resolution

Thurs April 18    The History of Graduation Ceremonies and Other School Rituals

The History of Graduation Ceremonies and Other School Rituals

Fri. April 19                  Read the types of jobs available for artists and others with a creative streak. CP 14

Answer and discuss the following questions. (1- or 2-paragraph responses each)

  1. Do you consider yourself to be artistic?  Explain.
    1. Is there a kind of art – drawing, painting, sculpture, graffiti, graphic novels, industrial/commercial art (advertising, branding, logos etc), fashion design, product design, photography, and so on – that you enjoy more than any other. Explain.
    1. Which artistic career listed below might you choose? Explain

____________________________________________________________

THE ROMANTIC PERIOD+  

Monday April 22 – Friday April 26

Mon. April 22      Snapshot                     p 716

Mon. April 22      Robert Burns              pp 733

Mon. April 22      To a Mouse                 pp 734-736     Q 1, 2a, 2b, 3a

Tues April 23     VOCAB TEST 3

Tues. April 23     Individual Reading After Test is Taken

Weds April 24     Read and respond to Bullfighting is Not a Sport…” – CP 15

Thurs April 25     Finish reading and responding to Bullfighting is Not a Sport…”

Navajo Job scene

CAREER VIDEO 1 Economic Policy Institute looking at Native American employment.

What are the main points of CAREER VIDEO 1?; Summarize CAREER VIDEO 1; How did you find this video useful? Explain.

CAREER VIDEO 2 Microphone Manufacturing in the Navajo Nation 

What are the main points of CAREER VIDEO 2?; Summarize CAREER VIDEO 2; How did you find this video useful? Explain.

Fri. April 26              22 Great Jobs for People Who Love to Travel (Internet Access Only)

https://www.businessnewsdaily.com/2389-jobs-travel-lovers.html

____________________________________________________________

Monday April 29 – Friday May 3

Mon. April 29      William Blake                               p 747

Mon. April 29      The Lamb                                      p 748           

Mon. April 29      The Tyger                                      p 749               Q1

Tues April 30      STUDY WORDS FOR VOCAB TEST 4

Weds May 1       Mayday Plane Crash Story – CP 16

  FRI MAY 3 DEADLINE FOR LONG-TERM PROJECT  

Thurs May 2       OPEN STUDY

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Monday May 6 – Friday April 10

Mon. May 6         Mary Shelley                                 p 759

Mon. May 6         Intro to Frankenstein            pp 760-764        Q 1, 2 & 3

Tues May 7         REVIEW WORDS FOR VOCAB TEST 4

Weds May 8       Grammar

Thurs May 9       SONG ANALYSES

LISTEN:    Tracy Chapman:          Fast car

LISTEN:    Stevie Wonder:            Isn’t She Lovely https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IVvkjuEAwgU

                           LISTEN:    Geto Boys:          Mind Playing Tricks On Me

In-Class Exercise

            i.  Listen to the three songs played in class.

            ii.  Select a song and respond to the following:

                        a.  Summarize what you think the song is saying

b.  Write a response to the person who wrote the song telling them what you think about the song.  (e.g. Do you like the song? Did it touch you emotionally or make you think? Do you see any truth in the song.) Explain why you think what you think.

c.  Would you have responded to the song differently if its lyrics were read aloud like a poem, without the music? Explain.

d.  Are any of the songs making an argument? If so, identify one argument being made in one song.

Friday May 10     WATCH:    Don’t follow your Passion

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MKlx1DLa9EA]

WATCH: Body language, the power in the palm of your hands

IN-CLASS EXERCISE 

Write a 2-paragraph review of each video that includes its main idea/claim(s) and major supporting evidence and your opinion of the content of the speaker’s speech.  (e.g. Agree with it? Helpful? Trust that the information presented? etc)

____________________________________________________________

THE VICTORIAN PERIOD +  

Monday May 13 – Friday May 17

Mon. May 13       The Rime of the Ancient       pp 819-845     Q 1, 2, 3 & 4

Mariner

Mon. May 13       Snapshot                                       p 942

Mon. May 13       Alfred Lord Tennyson                  p 959

Mon. May 13       The Lady of Shallot              pp 963-968         Q 1 & 2a

Tues May 14       VOCAB TEST 4

Weds May 15     Political (protest) song Essay

                                           ESSAY INSTRUCTIONS

WRITE A MINIMUM 300-WORD ESSAY ANALYSING A PROTEST SONG OR POEM OF YOUR CHOICE THAT INCLUDES THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION:

Author/writer?;  Title?;  What year is it from?;  Based on the text, what main political statement(s) is it making?;  How do you know this?;  Does it make the statement strongly?; (Explain)  Do you agree with the statement?; (Explain); What are some other ways to make the same statement?; Your Conclusion

My example of a political activist song: 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H-kA3UtBj4M 

(What’s Going On?, By Marvin Gaye, 1971) (5 Mins) (Protesting police brutality against war protestors.)

Thurs May  16    FINISH WRITING POLITICAL SONG ESSAY

Fri. April 17                  OPEN STUDY

____________________________________________________________

THE MODERN AND POSTMODERN PERIODS +  

Monday May 20 – Friday May 24

Mon. May 20       Defining the Novel                       pp 990-991

Mon. May 20       Dickens’ World                            pp 992-995

Mon. May 20       From Hard Times                           pp 998-1004       

Tues May 21       TBD

Weds May 22     TBD

Thurs May 23     TBD

Fri May 24  LAST DAY OF SCHOOL

LONG-TERM PROJECT (FINAL EXAM)

DUE FRIDAY MAY 3, 2019

ENGLISH 12 LONG-TERM PROJECT/FINAL SPRING 2019

PROJECT DESCRIPTION AND INSTRUCTIONS

Purposes of this project

1. To encourage students to think deeply about their Native American culture.

2.  To examine how “clashing” cultures affect each other and the people who practice them.

3.  To help alert students to life after high school, whether they remain on the reservation or choose to settle elsewhere.

4.  To help students practice vitally necessary time management skills by requiring students to independently schedule the reading, research and writing of their responses to the accompanying questions.

5.  To strengthen students’ reading, writing and research skills.

6.  To give students practice at working independently and taking personal responsibility for the quality and timeliness of their work.

7.  To give students the opportunity to create a piece of writing and scholarship that they can be proud of, and that they can offer to future employers and/or college admissions staff as evidence of their work ethic and strong time management skills.

Project Instructions

Students can work in groups of up to 3

Each member  of the group will be given exactly the same grade for the completed project unless there is an obvious disparity of effort of contribution in completing the project.

Students should:

1. read the accompanying article closely and view the accompanying pictures by clicking on the link pictures link provided.

2. read all of the accompanying questions carefully.

3. create a Time Management schedule for researching (where necessary) and responding to the accompanying questions, so that they meet the deadline for presentation of the entire project. (There will be no grade given for any portion of this project until the entire project package has been presented to Mr. K)

4. have a Time Management schedule approved by Mr. K

5. follow their Time Management schedule in responding to the questions.

6. bring their completed work to school for regular peer review sessions to be scheduled by Mr. K.

7.  produce, on time,  a quality, stapled or otherwise “bound” project packet, that includes all of the required responses – as separate and numbered responses – and any relevant research materials.

Deadline, Response length and Grading

1.  The deadline for the completion and presentation of this entire project is no later than FRIDAY MAY 3, 2019.

2.  This project will represent at least 10% of the student’s final class grade.

3.  Filling out an approved Time Management Schedule will account for 10% of the project grade.

4.  Unexcused late and missing work in the project packet will receive the same grade loss that other late work receives.

5.  The minimum length of response/word count to individual questions is noted next to the individual question.

6.  The final project packet must be COMPLETE to receive any grade at all.

Assistance and support for the completion of this project

1. Mr. K will offer the major portion of support for this project.

2.  Parents and others can also offer support as available.

3.  Teachers and others at MVHS can, at their own discretion, provide support, particularly regarding the research, cultural and governmental portions of this project.

QUESTIONS TO BE ANSWERED

  1. Which person’s story in the article, including the author’s, interests you the most, and why? (Min 300 words)
  • List and write the definitions of 20 words in this article that were new to you, or that you didn’t know the meaning of, before you read the article.
  • In what city and state is the Bay Area that the author is writing about? (Min one paragraph.)
  • The author mentions the “Civil Rights Movement”. Briefly describe what the Civil Rights Movement is and how the author says it helped Native Americans. (Min 300 words)
  • How does the writer say money is treated by many Native Americans, and how does he say it affects the Native American culture? Do you agree with him? Please explain why you do or don’t agree with him. (Min 400 words)
  • How do you think the writer of the article might describe Native Americans’ attitude to a “normal” 9-to-5pm workday? Please explain your response. (Min 300 words)
  • Do you think you will live on or off of the reservation when you graduate from High School or college? Please explain your response. (Min 300 words)
  • Do you feel connected to your Native American culture? If so, in what ways do you feel connected to that culture? If not, why do you think you do not feel connected to that culture? (Min 300 words)
  • Do you practice any rituals that are part of your Native American culture? If so, please explain those rituals and their purpose. If not, please explain a few such rituals you are aware of and their purpose, even though you don’t practice them. (Min 300 words)
  1. STUDENT RESEARCH REQUIRED:  What are the two definitions of wealth that the author presents to the reader. Please explain each kind of wealth. And do you think the author presents a full and fair picture of these different kinds of wealth? Please explain your response. (Min 500 words)
  1. How does the following partial quote in the article from Michelle Lot sum up the relationship many Native Americans have with the US government and with US lifestyle? (Min 200 words)

“My happiness is to use the wind, the water, and the sun to fulfill my needs, yet I can’t find a spot that the government tells me I’m not trespassing on.”

  1. According to Janeen Comenote, executive director of the National Urban Indian Family Coalition, what remains one of the most challenging aspects to contemporary urban Indian life? Do you agree or disagree with Comenote? Please explain your response. (Min 300 words)
  1. From your own experience, does the article represent Native American culture and attitudes accurately? Please explain your response. (Min 400 words)

PROJECT MANAGEMENT PLANNER

TASK                                I WILL COMPLETE THIS  TASK BY…            DATE TASK ACTUALLY COMPLETED

Read the Article

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TIME MANAGEMENT TIPS

Prioritize your assignments. …

  1. Prioritize your assignments
  2. Find a dedicated study space. …
  3. Create blocks of study time. …
  4. Schedule activities for after your school work. …
  5. Use helpful resources. …
  6. Join a study group. …
  7. Get exercise. …
  8. Be flexible.

…Time Managements Skills

  • Prioritize your assignments. … Start the habit of beginning your studying with the most difficult, or important, subject or task first. Tackling the hardest subjects first, while you’re still fresh and energized, will make the remainder of your studies much easier.
  • Find a dedicated study space. Some students will spend the first 20 minutes of their study time just looking for somewhere to study. A key to ongoing time management is to find a dedicated study space free from distractions where you can concentrate. If you want to change up your study space, that’s fine. Just make sure to find a study space that works and stick with it.    
  • Create blocks of study time. Not only should you have a dedicated study space, you should have dedicated study time–blocks of time where you focus on your studies. Blocks around 40 to 50 minutes are ideal, but may be longer or shorter based on the subject and your ability to focus. It’s okay to take study breaks during your blocks for a snack, or just to get up and walk around, but make sure to return to your studies.  
  • Schedule activities for after your school work. One of the most difficult, yet important, elements of effective time management is to put your school work first. It’s easy to say you’ll get your school work done later, or just before you go to bed. It’s just as easy to say you’ll do it tomorrow when bedtime arrives and you no longer have the disposition or energy to get it done. Complete your school work as soon as possible. Putting off less important activities until after you complete your school work will allow you stay on track and focus on your “fun” activities without the pressure looming school work. 
  • Use helpful resources. The old adage, if at first you don’t succeed, try, try, try again, while useful for many of life’s situations, isn’t always the best philosophy when you’re strapped for time and can’t figure out your … homework. As you progress through middle school, high school and then into college, it’s wise to rely on the help, expertise and knowledge of others to assist you with the learning process. Smart friends, tutors, study groups, and even the Internet, are useful resources for tackling complex subjects and making the most effective use of your time. 
  • Join a study group. Study groups offer several advantages to students, one of which is the ability to cover more material faster. Working in a study group makes it possible to research and learn about various topics quickly. Each member is assigned a topic and then provides a summary to the group.         
  • Get exercise. Eat right. Get plenty of sleep. Yeah, you’ve heard this before, but let us say it again. Get exercise, eat right and get plenty of sleep. If you’re not at your peak, you won’t be able to focus or concentrate, nor will you have the energy or stamina to get your studies completed efficiently. Going to bed an hour early, can make all the difference the next day in your ability to make the best use of your time.     
  • Be flexible. You can’t plan for everything. Unforeseen obstacles are bound to pop up, so plan accordingly and be flexible. Just be sure to get back on track as soon as possible and to stick to your plan.

http://www.educationcorner.com/effective-time-management.html

ACKNOWLEDGMENT AND AGREEMENT TO COMPLETE THIS PROJECT

I understand and agree to complete, on time and to the best of my ability, the 2017 English 12 Long-Term Project as described in the project description I received from Mr. K.

PRINT NAME: ___________________________________              DATE:____________________

SIGNATURE_______________________________________

GUARDIAN ARTICLE

ENGLISH 12 LONG-TERM PROJECT/FINAL SPRING 2019

Most Native Americans live in cities, not reservations. Here are their stories

This summer, Joe Whittle decided to document the experiences of some of the 140,000 Native Americans who call the Bay Area home

Joe Whittle

Monday 4 September 2017

As I left my small, remote hometown of Joseph, Oregon, driving two hours to the nearest airport to fly south, I thought about my father, a Caddo/Delaware Native American man who spent most of his life in the Bay Area.

Dad arrived in California as a child due to the assimilation policies enacted by the US government in the 1950s, which forcefully relocated Native Americans from their land into urban areas to become “productive” members of society. It also intentionally placed Indian orphans into the homes of white families. Today, 78% of Native Americans live off-reservation, and 72% live in urban or suburban environments. Those policies had devastating effects. Relocated tribal members became isolated from their communities. Low paying jobs and higher expenses, combined with the inability to return to reservations which had often been dissolved, left many in precarious circumstances.

In the case of my dad, this translated to growing up on the rough streets of Richmond, CA, and spending much of his life burying his trauma at the bottom of a bottle. He was orphaned twice; first when my Native grandmother died in our tribal territory, then when his adopted white mother passed when he was 16. Dad never knew who his birth father was, and his adopted father was also an alcoholic who died not many years after his wife.

My dad’s love for his children was deep, but so was his pain. As a result, my father was barely a physical presence in my life, let alone an economic one. He was terrible with money: if he had it, he spent it.

Indigenous people are not supposed to have money. We were never meant to. My tribes occupied our homelands consistently for 13,000 years without it, and we were rich beyond our wildest dreams. We had advanced seasonal permaculture, hunting and fishing patterns, and vast amounts of leisure time. Yet we’ve had about 150 years to change 13,000 years of subsistence lifestyle into a complete dependence on money. To us, that is an incredibly weakened state.

With the civil rights movement, however, came a rebirth in self-determination. Groups such as the American Indian Movement were founded to put political pressure on the federal government. Many urban Natives found ways to rise above their challenges, eventually forming the “Native middle class”. They began contributing back to their original communities.

This summer, I decided to document the experiences of some of the 140,000 Native Americans who call the Bay Area home. There, 18.50% of the Native population live below the poverty level, versus 10.4% of the white population. Among those living below poverty level, 24% of those are in “deep poverty”.

According to Janeen Comenote, executive director of the National Urban Indian Family Coalition, “poverty remains one of the most challenging aspects to contemporary urban Indian life. While I do recognize that a sizable chunk of our populations are solidly middle class, every Native person I know has either experienced poverty or has a family member who is. Housing and homelessness remain at the top of the list of challenges.”

Chah-tah Gould: ‘ Even the ones who are into gangs, they still go to powwows’

Chah-tah Gould, who is a film-maker, is currently producing a film about an urban Native superhero who breaks stereotypes about Native Americans. Photograph: Joe Whittle for The Guardian

Chah-tah Gould stands in front of a banner listing the names of the companies that built stores on top of his tribe’s burial shellmound. These days, it is known as the Bay Street Shopping Mall in Emeryville. He will not enter the plaza any further than this point due to it being a violation of his tribe’s sacred protocol: the buildings are desecrating his ancestors’ graves.

Sometimes, his friends will go to the mall and forget about his relationship with the land – he always asks them to stop so he can get out of the car.

Chah-tah, a lifelong Oakland resident, is one of few Ohlone tribal members left. The Ohlone went nearly extinct after generations of slavery and colonization by Spain, Mexico, and the US; they are currently petitioning for federal recognition.

His mother, Corrina Gould, has been one of the lead organizers against the construction of the mall. While some graves were interred, many believe that hundreds of graves and human remains still lie underneath the development. On Black Friday every year, Native people gather to protest outside the mall and inform shoppers about the history of the place.

“A lot of city Natives grow up in foster care,” says Chah-tah. “Growing up they try to fit in, and fitting in Oakland is getting into gang stuff, fighting, everything like that. It happens a lot, even to non-city Natives.”

“I feel like on reservations, it’s a whole different story. They grow up around their culture. But when they transition to here, it’s a whole different game. To fit in, they start acting and thinking differently, and it gets to the point where it’s almost like a disease. You know, to be cool, you start drinking, you start smoking, all this other stuff. I got into some stuff like that. Luckily for me I got away from all of it. I realized, ‘this isn’t who I am’.”

There’s hope, however. “Even the ones who are into gangs and stuff, they still go to powwows,” Chah-tah says. “I like that a lot of Natives do know their culture.”

I ask him how he stays away from negative influences. “There are a lot of centers and programs,” he says. “But I feel like you have to put effort into staying in the Native community. Out here you have to deal with life – you know, the American-type life; taxes, jobs, everything like that. So it gets to a point where you have to choose. Materialistic things can become the priority and you miss out on the whole experience of what your people are about.”

Michelle Lot: ‘I can’t find a spot that the government tells me I’m not trespassing on’

Michelle Lot at a protest camp. Her grandmother had always told her that she has Cherokee and Delaware/Dutch descent, and her son’s father is Haudenosaunee. Photograph: Joe Whittle for The Guardian

Sporting a large “No DAPL” pin on her hat in the photo above, Michelle Lot peels “bear root medicine” for her son, who suffers from a lung ailment. He is seated underneath a towel in the background steaming the root in a coffee pot to inhale the root’s medicinal vapors.

I met Michelle and her son in a homeless protest camp in Berkeley, underneath the Bay Area Rapid Transit line (Bart), which can be seen screeching by above her. It was reminiscent of a miniature Standing Rock camp, with protest signs against corporate greed along with an upside down American flag and a Veterans for Peace flag. Michelle is a former nurse, and she serves as the camp medic and “aunty”.

Michelle is a leader in the homeless activist group First They Came For The Homeless, which describes itself as “a group of unhoused people organized on the streets of Berkeley for mutual support and to promote a political message regarding homelessness, homeless people, income inequality, and the privatization of the commons in the US”.

“My happiness is to use the wind, the water, and the sun to fulfill my needs, yet I can’t find a spot that the government tells me I’m not trespassing on. But I’m an Earthling,” says Michelle.

Michael Horse: ‘I am still amazed at the lack of knowledge of Native culture’

Yaqui tribal member Michael Horse testifies to the Oakland City Planning Commission. Photograph: Joe Whittle for The Guardian

Michael Horse is an award-winning artist currently starring in the TV series Twin Peaks. He was recently at the Oakland Planning Commission to speak on behalf of a recurring sweat lodge ceremony – a Native spiritual tradition – which was banned by the city after a group of neighbors complained about the smoke from the fire used to heat rocks for the lodge twice a month (some of the complainants can be seen in the first and second rows behind him).

Many other residents and neighbors came forward to testify that the smoke did not bother them, and compared it to the smoke from countless BBQ’s that happen in the neighborhood uncontested, or other people’s backyard campfire pits.

Well over 100 supporters showed up to testify on behalf of allowing the ceremony, citing the American Indian Freedom of Religion Act. The planning commission overturned the ban.

“I am still amazed at the lack of knowledge of Native culture,” says Michael. “It has been a struggle for so many years to try to educate people, especially elected officials, about our rights under the laws of the US to practice our religions and ceremonies and to pray in our own ways.”

Patricia St Onge: ‘The overwhelming experience of racism was so transformative’

Patricia St Onge in her garden. Photograph: Joe Whittle for The Guardian

Patricia St Onge owns the property on which the contested sweat lodge is built. She is a descendant of the Mohawk Tribe, as well as adopted Lakota. I visited Patricia at her home, which also serves as a community spiritual space for local spiritual practitioners.

“I grew up in New Hampshire in a little French Canadian enclave,” says Patricia. “Because I have white skin privilege, and was living in a community where there was no Indian community to speak of, I never felt culturally Native. I married an African American man, and we had kids. The overwhelming experience of racism that we experienced as a family in New England was so transformative. From the time my kids were little, we had neighbors petition our landlord to evict us.”

After a series of moves to various urban localities in the late 1980s, they finally moved to Oakland so Patricia could go to graduate school. “When we got here, we found a place, we found jobs,” says Patricia. “In Boston my husband was a social worker and had clients who would rather not have a social worker at all than have a black man for a social worker. We became really close as a family because of all of this.”

Patricia’s experiences with racism against her family led her to seek the connection with her Native heritage. “When we finally got to Oakland in 1987, one of the first things I did was to look for the Indian community, and I found the Oakland Intertribal Friendship House. So we started going there and getting involved.”

Patricia went on to become the founding director of Habitat For Humanity Oakland and worked as a nonprofit consultant. It wasn’t long before she had to face another cultural challenge to her family’s identity though. About five years ago the complaints about the sweat lodge began, eventually leading the city to ban them.

It wasn’t until the week I visited Patricia, this July, that the ban was finally overturned.

Decoy Gallerina: ‘I’ve had endless love-filled experiences in my life’

Decoy Gallerina: ‘I’ve had endless beautiful and love-filled experiences in my life’. Photograph: Joe Whittle

I met Decoy Gallerina after she gave testimony about how traditional Native ceremonies have helped her heal from abuse and trauma.

Decoy, a Chiricahua Apache tribal member and artist, rents a bedroom in a rundown ranch style “mansion” located in the Oakland hills with multiple roommates. I interviewed her out by the home’s once impressive poolside, which the landlady had recently allowed her to fill with water again.

“Two years after my mother and father married, they divorced due to alcoholism on both their parts,” says Decoy. “My mother, grandmother, aunt and I moved to the Bay Area through the Relocation Act.”

Decoy had complicated relationships with her mother and aunt, but her grandmother “recognized and accepted me completely. I don’t remember her ever saying one negative word to me, only encouragement.”

“When my 13th year came, my grandmother left to take care of my schizophrenic uncle. In the past, when she would travel on her own, she would always return. This time, she simply disappeared from my life and my whole world changed. I lost not only my connection with her, but all the presence, love and acceptance of hundreds of relatives in Mescalero and Oklahoma.” As a result, she was left on her own in her mid-teenage years, with no parental support.

When she was 15, Decoy was raped by an 18-year-old man. She became almost completely silent and withdrawn. “I was raped again when I was about 18 by a man 23-years-old or so,” she says. “I never identified it as rape until years later when I was in a support group for suicide attempt survivors. I heard someone else tell her story and I said to myself, ‘That happened to me’, with absolutely no emotional connection to the thought.”

Among American Indian and Alaska Native women, 56.1% have experienced sexual violence in their lifetime (over 70% of the perpetrators are non-Native).

I was profoundly struck by Decoy’s words when she told me she was “so blessed” to have never become a prostitute or addict. There wasn’t an ounce of cynicism in those words, but rather wholehearted gratitude.

“I’ve had endless beautiful and love-filled experiences in my life,” she says. “I’ve studied art my whole life – dance, singing, writing, visual arts, performance, bead work with amazing and famous artists since I was tiny. I have been blessed to have the ability to absorb and produce almost any artistic form. Creator chose me as a vehicle for these things, is all I can say. I am an artistic being who has PTSD, and I’ve suffered from chronic, deep suicidal depression, OCD, low self esteem, and self-abusive behaviors for most of my life. Side by side with that I am a courageous, tenacious, kind and ferocious spirit.”

She hopes her story can be an inspiration to others facing similar struggles.

Isabella Zizi is Northern Cheyenne, Arikara and Muscogee Creek. She lives in Richmond, California.

Quote from Isabella Zizi: ‘We are a minority mixed within a minority group’

Isabella’s grandmother, Wanda Jean Bulletti, was relocated to the Bay Area from her reservation in the 1950s. Wanda had been Christianized and had given up her traditional ways, but she quietly stayed active her whole life reaching out to disenfranchised groups. She eventually helped to create the Native American health and cultural centers in Richmond. Today, Isabella continues that work as an organizer.

Growing up off-reservation in an urban environment outside her tribal community turned out to be a challenge. “We aren’t able to culturally find out who we truly are because we’ve been displaced. I feel like that puts historical trauma on us, and we really just want to disconnect. It makes us not feel welcomed and not feel complete because we are a minority mixed within a minority group.”

So she struggled finding a place to fit in. Natives are so dispersed and statistically sparse that it rarely allows creation of a peer subgroup in an off-reservation environment. “What am I going to do? Who am I going to talk to?” she found herself thinking as a teenager. “Going through that stage creates depression. It shuts us down living in an urban city,” she says.

As she grew older and became more involved in Native activism, Isabella found ways to strengthen her Indigenous identity. “I feel like I am breaking that stereotypical mindset that all Natives live on reservations,” says Isabella. “Although I don’t live in my own territory, I am still connected to my Indigenous ways. There are many ways we still practice our ceremonies. We’re able to be in prayer, or just be in a beautiful circle with different Natives here in the Bay Area in one of the most urban places I know of,” she says with a laugh.

Star Morgan: ‘They didn’t know about our struggle until we made our voices heard’

Star Morgan went to Standing Rock aged 17.

Star Morgan is an 18-year-old member of the Navajo Nation. I asked her if she’d like to meet for somewhere where she feels connected to her culture. She chose Twin Peaks, a hilltop at the crown of San Francisco overlooking the entire Bay Area. Chilly coastal fog rolled in around us. Zipping up our jackets, I commented on its biting effects and Star laughed at the complaints: “I love this!”

When she was 17, Star found a way to travel to the Standing Rock protest camp with a bunch of strangers. She was on the Backwater Bridge when over 150 people contracted hypothermia from police water cannons spraying them in below-freezing temperatures. Countless injuries were sustained from police armaments, including the near losses of an eye and an arm for two young women not much older than Star (my own daughter was shot at with rubber bullets while kneeling on the ground praying).

“We gotta stick together, because there’s not very many of us,” Star says with a chuckle. “We’re supposed to stick together, and be unified. That’s why when I went to Standing Rock, it was amazing. Over 300 tribes came together just to protect water! We stood our ground. It felt really empowering. People went to Standing Rock with little or no money and just the clothes they had on their back to stand up for what’s right.”

Star has struggled intensely with depression, anxiety and PTSD, and has witnessed severe violence in her life. She saw her brother, who suffers from bipolar disorder, beaten by police who didn’t understand his strange behavior; he now has permanent brain damage. (According to the Center on Juvenile Crime and Justice, Native Americans are the most likely race to experience police violence in the US.)

She has been a mentee in the Native Mentorship in Public Health Program, which encourages physical, spiritual and mental wellness for Indigenous youth. The program provides a variety of activities to help prevent substance abuse and promote leadership, communication and self-empowerment skills.

“I don’t want to be one of the ones to stay silent,” she says. “I want to go and do something. It was healing to know people came from all over [to Standing Rock] just to protect the water. It was like a balance of really bad and really good at the same time.”

The author’s stepmother and daughter at a memorial ceremony for his father at the Point Reyes National Seashore. Many urban Natives still find ways to connect with ancestral and natural traditions. Photograph: Joe Whittle for The Guardian

My conversation with Star left me reflecting on the fact that no matter where I go in Indian Country, I see the same Indigenous values – ones that transcends far beyond economics. It’s a value system that has nothing whatsoever to do with money.

Even though money is here to stay, so are our Indigenous ways. Is it possible for the two to exist in congruity? I don’t know. But I can say that it is possible for Indigenous people to survive and thrive despite the incongruities that may be placed in their paths. It is illustrated time and again, whether in the refusal of the Standing Rock Sioux to take pipeline payoffs, in teenagers putting their bodies on the line, or in the resistance of the Ohlone to having their graves desecrated by consumerism.

An excellent demonstration of that value system is still exhibited today among many of the Pacific Northwest tribes who practice Potlatch culture, where the value of someone’s wealth is measured by how much they are able to give away to their tribe and honored relations and guests. The more you are able to give away, the more social esteem and value as a “wealthy” person you earn. Your value within the culture is measured by how much you give, not by how much you take and accrue.

To me, values like that explain the humbling strength and resilience I found in every Native person I met in the course of this story.

***

LINK TO THE ARTICLE:  https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2017/sep/04/native-americans-stories-california

LINK TO PHOTOS FROM THE ARTICLE:  https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2017/sep/04/native-americans-stories-california#img-1

QUESTIONS OF THE DAY

SPRING 2019 QUESTIONS OF THE DAY BY DATE

Monday January 14 – Friday January 18   

Mon. Jan 14         What does the following advice mean to you: “Live life to the fullest, and focus on the positive.”

Tues Jan 15         What does this quote mean to you?  “You can do anything [you want], but not everything [you want].” David Allen [Irish Comedian]

Weds Jan 16        What was the best meal you ever ate (or would like to eat? Describe the meal in as much detail as you can. [NO SCHOOL/WEATHER]

Thurs Jan 17        What do you enjoy most about living on the reservation?

Fri. Jan 18            What is your favorite genre of movie and why?

Monday January 21 – Friday January 25

Mon. Jan 21        NO SCHOOL MLK DAY

Tues Jan 22         Would you cheat on a test if you knew you would not get caught? Explain.                                            

Weds Jan 23        What’s the greatest thing about being you? Explain.

Thurs Jan 24        Should we pay attention to superstitions? Explain. What superstitions do you have?

Fri. Jan 25            What three stores or other businesses would you bring to Kayenta if you could, and why?

Monday January 28 – Friday February 1

Mon. Jan 28         If you could choose one tool to help you survive on a deserted island, what tool would you choose and why?

Tues Jan 29         What five words best describe a “good person”? Briefly explain why you have chosen each word.

Weds Jan 30        List five qualities, personal or professional, that will make you valuable to an employer. Explain.

Thurs Jan 31        How will you decide where to apply to college or to work?

Fri. Feb 1             If you were invited to a very expensive reception, bustling with big stars from movies and sports, would you attend? Explain.

Monday February 4 – Friday February 8

Mon Feb 4            Is being bored a personal choice? Explain.

Tues Feb 5           In your opinion, what’s the absolute worst job in the world? Explain.

Weds Feb 6         List the three most important elements of a good song or piece of music.  Explain.

Thurs Feb 7         Do animals know the difference between right and wrong? Explain.

Fri. Feb 8             If you could have the combined abilities of two animals, which two animals’ powers would you choose to combine?  Explain.

Monday February 11 – Friday February 15

Mon Feb 11          If you had 10 straight winter weekends to build something, what would you build? Explain.

Tues Feb 12         Do you enjoy spending time alone? Explain.

Weds Feb 13       For you, what, realistically, would be the best and worst outcomes a  Parent-Teacher conferences in October for each of the subjects you are taking? Explain.

Thurs Feb 14       Complete this sentence: “I’ll know I’m ready to leave home and start a family if and when …

Fri. Feb 15           Explain, in as much detail as you can, your first pleasant memory

Monday February 18 – Friday February 22

Mon Feb 18         NO SCHOOL   PRESIDENT’S DAY

Tues Feb 19         What’s your favorite day of the week? Explain.

Weds Feb 20       Write about whatever you’d like to for 15 minutes.

Thurs Feb 21       Are beauty pageants a good or bad idea? Explain.

Fri. Feb 22           What do you think about in the morning on the way to school and in the afternoon going home?

Monday February 25 – Friday March 1

Mon Feb 25          What three things are you most grateful for in life? Explain.

Tues Feb 26         What qualities does a good US President need? Explain.

Weds Feb 27       If you could break a world record, what  world record would you like to break and why?

Thurs Feb 28       What’s your favorite sport and why?

Fri.  Feb 29          Would you rather live 75 years as a rich person or 85 years as a poor person?  Explain.

Monday March 4 – Friday March 8

Mon. Mar 4           What things are you able to repair or create? Explain.

Tues Mar 5           What’s the most interesting piece of information you heard over the weekend? Explain.

Weds Mar 6        What will you miss most about high school after graduating? Explain.

Thurs Mar 7         Discover and describe in detail any object, sound or smell in the classroom you hadn’t noticed before.

Monday March 11 – Friday March 15

Mon. Mar 11         What gift would you most like for your next birthday?  Explain.

Tues Mar 12         What is a prayer? Explain.

Weds Mar 13       What part of your school day is most uncomfortable for you?  Explain.

Thurs Mar 14       What skills does someone need to one day become an excellent grandparent? Explain.

Fri. Mar 15           Would you try to physically break up a fight between two freshmen? Explain.                                            

SPRING BREAK (March 18 – 22)

Monday March 25 – Friday March 29

Mon. Mar 25         What’s your favorite Holiday and why?

Tues. Mar 26        Do you think English should be an elective course for seniors at MVHS? Explain.

Weds Mar 27       How important in your life is the ability to forgive or be forgiven?  Explain.

Thurs Mar 28       What five useful tips would you give a transfer sophomore student from a big city to help them be happy at MVHS and living in Kayenta? Explain why your tips would be useful.

Fri. Mar 29           If someone gave you a $100 bill to spend as you want, how would you spend it? Explain.

Monday April 1 – Friday April 5

Mon. April 1          What kind of hitchhiker would pick up or not pick up? Explain.

Tues April 2          Is it true that “money makes the world go around? Explain.

Weds April 3        Write a 25-day personal plan for academic success for the remainder of this semester.

Thurs April 4        What problems will a student and his/her family face if the student doesn’t graduate on time?

Fri. April 5            List three questions that you would like to ask somebody who has fought in a war, and/or who remained home while a loved one was fighting in a war. Briefly explain each question.

Monday April 8 – Friday April 12  

Mon. April 8          How would your best friend describe your personality?  Explain.

Tues April 9          How would you protect yourself and your family during an alien zombie attack?  Explain.

Weds. April 10     What do you think the future holds in store for you?  Explain.

Thurs April 11      Do you give money to panhandlers? Explain.

Fri. April 12          What foods taste just as good or better reheated than originally cooked?

Monday April 15 – Friday April 19

Mon. April 15        Do NWEA or AZ Merit tests do you any good? Explain.

Tues April 16        Should it be legal to sell alcohol to adults on the reservation? Explain.

Weds April 17      What’s your favorite/worst words? Explain.

Thurs April 18      What place – on Earth or elsewhere – would you most like to visit?  Explain.

Fri. April 19          What product or process do you wish you had invented? Explain.

Monday April 22 – Friday April 26

Mon. April 22        Should the school let dogs hang out around where students enter and leave the school buildings?  Explain.

Tues April 23        Is there a difference between kindness and weakness?  Explain.

Weds April 24      Which member of your family has a personality most similar to yours? Explain.

Thurs April 25      What’s your dream car/truck?  Explain.

Fri. April 26          How long is your attention span? Explain.

Monday April 29 – Friday May 3

Mon. April 29        Do you trust the Internet as a source of reliable information? Explain.

Tues April 30        Who are cooler, boys or girls? Explain.

Weds May 1         Which superhero would you NOT want as a roommate at college? Explain.

Thurs May 2         If you could run a business what and where would that business be? Explain.

Fri May 3              What’s the furthest you’ve ever walked, and why did you walk that far?

Monday May 6 – Friday April 10

Mon. May 6          What relationship do you have with your name?

Tues May 7          Do fire drills make the school safer? Explain.

Thurs May 9         Do you prefer to shop online or in actual stores? Explain.

Friday May 10      What one thing in your personal history do you wish you could change? Explain.

Monday May 13 – Friday May 17

Mon. May 13        With so much information available on the Internet, what use are teachers? Explain.

Tues May 14        What is your favorite and least favorite theme park ride? Explain.

Weds May 15       Do you  believe in ghosts? Explain.

Thurs May  16      What’s your favorite number? Explain.

Fri. May 17           How is you Summer Break going to go?

Monday May 20 – Friday May 24

Mon. May 20        NO QotD

Tues May 21        NO QotD

Weds May 22       NO QotD

Thurs May 23       NO QotD

Fri May 24           LAST DAY OF SCHOOL

READING CONTENT

CP 01

14 Tips for Writing a Rockstar Resume 

January 25, 2018  Posted by Rebecca Safier

Your resume is your first line of defense on the quest for a new job. Before hitting send, you should do everything you can to 

make your resume stand out. Even if your work experience is perfect, a subpar resume could sink your chances of getting a job interview. But if you combine relevant experience with an effective resume, you’ll sail right into the interview stage.

How to build a resume hiring managers will notice

If you want to impress recruiters on your quest for a job, follow these 14 essential tips on how to make a good resume.

1. Think of your resume as a marketing tool

It’s easy to think of your resume as a summary of your work experience. But a resume isn’t just about listing your professional history. Rather, it’s a strategic tool for marketing your individual brand.

Consider the perspective of a recruiter. The recruiter is seeking a candidate who fits a job description and can bring value to an organization. They don’t have time to delve into your resume and figure out who you are, so you need to connect the dots for them. 

As you build a resume, think strategically. Consider what you’ve accomplished in the past and what you can offer in the future. Make sure your resume tells a clear story about who you are as a professional. When it comes to the job hunt, you need to sell yourself as

the best candidate for the role.

2. Tailor your resume to each new job

Along similar lines, you won’t have much luck sending off dozens of the same resume to lots of different employers. Instead of

treating your resume like a form letter, tailor it to each new role

“One of the most common resume mistakes … is creating one single resume and sending it out to every hiring company they can

find,” said career expert Jason Hill, founder of Sound Advice. “I call this the ‘shotgun approach.’ Do not do this.”

Instead, research the company and read the job description closely. Figure out exactly what the organization is looking for, then

reflect those qualifications in your resume. While changing up your resume for every application is time-consuming, it’s well worth

the effort. It might help to keep a master list of all your experiences to refer back to. That way, you can keep track of which

experiences you’re including and which ones you’re leaving off depending on the job. “Make a master resume (a huge list of every single accomplishment, skill, talent, etc. that you have) and select whatever is relevant to the one specific job you’re applying for,”

said Hill.

3. Curate a sleek, uncluttered design

Another way to impress a recruiter right off the bat is with a sleek, easily digestible resume design. Don’t be afraid to cut out

irrelevant experience for the sake of improving readability. White space can go a long way toward making a resume more appealing. Use a simple font such as Times New Roman or Arial in 10-, 11-, or 12-point size. If you’re seeking a creative position, you could benefit from incorporating a unique design element into your resume. Otherwise, stick to a simple, elegant design.

“You have one minute or less to make a stellar first impression,” said Hill. “Utilize bullet points, short paragraphs, measurable achievements, and industry-specific keywords to stand out above the rest. If it’s important, it’s your responsibility to make sure the recruiter sees it.”

4. Offer a skills summary right off the bat

As you start to build a resume, consider adding a skills summary to the top. Make sure to reflect the job description when you

describe your own areas of proficiency. For instance, a company hiring a digital product designer might look for someone skilled in a program like Sketch or InVision. A recruiter looking for a marketer might seek someone familiar with Google Analytics and Google AdWords. Review the job description as you build your skills summary. That way, this section can be both accurate and tailored to

the job at hand.

5. Incorporate major keywords

Every recruiter is looking for specific keywords when they first look at a resume. In fact, this initial review might not even be done by a recruiter, but rather by a computer program. “Resumes are rarely viewed by human eyes in the first round of the hiring process,” explained Niquenya Collins, president and CEO of Building Bridges Consulting. “Instead, a computerized Applicant Tracking System (ATS) takes the first crack at narrowing the hundreds of applications received by every job announcement.” The ATS picks out keywords and phrases that match the job description. Without them, your application could get eliminated before it even reaches

human resources.

6. Ditch the personal objective statement

Career counselors used to encourage applicants to include a personal objective statement at the top of their resume. It would say something about what kind of job and organization you’re seeking. But the objective statement has largely fallen out of favor. For one thing, recruiters tend to care more about what they’re looking for than what you’re looking for. Another important reason is that

objective statements are often too generic to add much. Unless you’re able to make an impactful statement, it won’t improve your application. It’s better to leave it off.

7. Put your work experience before your education

Unless you just graduated from college, put your work experience before your education. If you’ve been in the workforce for a few years, recruiters don’t care so much about your educational accomplishments. They want to see your professional experience and skills. If you’re worried about age discrimination, you can leave off your year of graduation. Most organizations want to see you have

a relevant degree, but don’t care as much when you got it.

8. Highlight your accomplishments rather than your responsibilities

When you build a resume, you’ll provide a few bullet points under each job title. But don’t use this space to simply describe your responsibilities. Instead, focus on your achievements. “Don’t just rewrite the job description for your previous jobs, I promise you it

won’t make an impression,” said Eleni Cotsis, a hiring manager for AllTheRooms and freelance recruiter for New York-based

startups. “Explain what you accomplished and why you did the job better than someone else would have in that same position.” For example, consider these two statements for someone in account management:

— Handled accounts for public relations firm.

— Managed 10 accounts in excess of $5 million annually and came in under budget by 10 percent.

The second statement is a lot better than the first because it focuses on an accomplishment. The first merely describes a duty — it doesn’t say whether the applicant was successful or not. Plus, it quantifies the achievement, thereby making it more concrete. By providing data, you’ll leave a stronger impression than you would with a vague statement.

“Think of the mark you left on each company,” Cotsis advised. “What specific, measurable results were accomplished because you were in that position and not somebody else?” Remember, past performance indicates future performance. By highlighting past

areas of success, you’ll show the recruiter you’ll be similarly successful in the future.

 9. Use proactive action verbs

Beyond quantifying your areas of success, also aim to use proactive action verbs. Some effective verbs for resumes include:

Developed

Implemented

Directed

Supervised

Created

Invented

Facilitated

Supplied

Initiated

Streamlined

Provided

Solved

Guided

Trained

Taught

Tracked

Conducted

Power verbs like these put you in the driver’s seat. If you start a bullet point with “responsible for,” you’re not saying much about what you did in the role. As you build your resume, remember to sell yourself. If the resume could be about anyone with a similar work history, you need to rework the language to sound more proactive and unique.

10. Organize your experiences in reverse chronological order

As you put together your work experiences, order them from most to least recent. Again, recruiters are likely reviewing a lot of

resumes. They want to see your career progression easily. If your work is in reverse chronological order, they’ll be able to see the timeline right away. But you don’t have to include every job you’ve ever had in your life. Once you’ve been out of college for a few years, you probably don’t need to include that summer you sold slushies at the beach. If you have any major employment gaps, you may want to provide a brief explanation. For instance, you could indicate the company closed or laid off a hundred workers. Or you could write you traveled internationally or went on parental leave. That way, a recruiter will understand the gap instead of seeing it

as a red flag.

11. Limit your resume to one page

You may have heard the warning not to exceed one page for your resume. For most people, this old rule of thumb holds true. You should be able to communicate everything you need to say on a single page. Of course, there may be some situations where it makes sense to exceed a page. For instance, you may need additional bandwidth if you’re applying for upper management or a

professorship at a college. But otherwise, you’ll likely be better off sticking to one page. If you’re emailing your resume, try saving it

as a PDF first. That way, the recruiter will see the right page length and formatting.

12. Proofread several times

When you build a resume, you must be very detail-oriented. First, you must ensure a consistent design. Be intentional about margins, font, font size, and spacing. Second, double check your spelling, punctuation, and word choice. And make sure your dates of employment are correct. “Clean formatting and no typos are huge for me,” said Stephanie Prause, a corporate communications professional who works with college students on their resumes. “I almost immediately write off candidates who fail on these two

items.” A resume contains a lot of specific information. Before sending it off to an organization, check everything for accuracy.

13. Ask for advice

It can also be helpful to seek out another pair of eyes. Ask a friend or coworker to look over your resume. When you stare at a document for a long time, sometimes you can no longer see its strengths and weaknesses. Gaining a fresh and objective perspective can help you identify areas for improvement.

14. Ramp up your LinkedIn profile

Beyond your resume, many recruiters check out your LinkedIn profile. LinkedIn is also a useful tool for reaching out to your network and discovering job opportunities. So don’t forget to build your LinkedIn profile with as much care as you do your resume. Use the

same principles on LinkedIn as you do in your resume. Use action verbs and highlight your accomplishments. You can also add testimonials from past employers or coworkers. Make sure your LinkedIn profile and resume are consistent with each other. You wouldn’t want a recruiter to ask why your LinkedIn profile tells a different story than your resume.

Go beyond the resume and make networking a priority

While your resume is an essential tool in the job hunt, networking should also be a priority. According to LinkedIn, 85 percent of all

jobs get filled through networking. You have a much better shot of getting an interview thanks to a personal or professional

 connection. Rely on your professional and college network to make industry contacts, and make sure you have an outstanding,

up-to-date resume to share when you find jobs of interest. By following these tips on how to make a good resume, you’ll be one step closer to scoring an interview for your dream job. This article originally appeared on Student Loan Hero. It is reprinted with

permission.   SOURCE:  https://www.glassdoor.com/blog/rockstar-resume-tips/

CP 02

THE TELL-TALE HEART 

By Edgar Allan Poe – Published 1843

True! –nervous –very, very dreadfully nervous I had been and am; but why will you say that I am mad? The disease had sharpened my senses –not destroyed –not dulled them. Above all was the sense of hearing acute. I heard all things in the heaven and in the earth. I heard many things in hell. How, then, am I mad? Hearken! and observe how healthily –how calmly I can tell you the whole story.

It is impossible to say how first the idea entered my brain; but once conceived, it haunted me day and night. Object there was none. Passion there was none. I loved the old man. He had never wronged me. He had never given me insult. For his gold I had no desire. I think it was his eye! yes, it was this! He had the eye of a vulture –a pale blue eye, with a film over it. Whenever it fell upon me, my blood ran cold; and so by degrees –very gradually –I made up my mind to take the life of the old man, and thus rid myself of the eye forever.

Now this is the point. You fancy me mad. Madmen know nothing. But you should have seen me. You should have seen how wisely I proceeded –with what caution –with what foresight –with what dissimulation I went to work! I was never kinder to the old man than during the whole week before I killed him. And every night, about midnight, I turned the latch of his door and opened it –oh so gently! And then, when I had made an opening sufficient for my head, I put in a dark lantern, all closed, closed, that no light shone out, and then I thrust in my head. Oh, you would have laughed to see how cunningly I thrust it in! I moved it slowly –very, very slowly, so that I might not disturb the old man’s sleep. It took me an hour to place my whole head within the opening so far that I could see him as he lay upon his bed. Ha! would a madman have been so wise as this, And then, when my head was well in the room, I undid the lantern cautiously-oh, so cautiously –cautiously (for the hinges creaked) –I undid it just so much that a single thin ray fell upon the vulture eye. And this I did for seven long nights –every night just at midnight –but I found the eye always closed; and so it was impossible to do the work; for it was not the old man who vexed me, but his Evil Eye. And every morning, when the day broke, I went boldly into the chamber, and spoke courageously to him, calling him by name in a hearty tone, and inquiring how he has passed the night. So you see he would have been a very profound old man, indeed, to suspect that every night, just at twelve, I looked in upon him while he slept.

Upon the eighth night I was more than usually cautious in opening the door. A watch’s minute hand moves more quickly than did mine. Never before that night had I felt the extent of my own powers –of my sagacity. I could scarcely contain my feelings of triumph. To think that there I was, opening the door, little by little, and he not even to dream of my secret deeds or thoughts. I fairly chuckled at the idea; and perhaps he heard me; for he moved on the bed suddenly, as if startled. Now you may think that I drew back –but no. His room was as black as pitch with the thick darkness, (for the shutters were close fastened, through fear of robbers,) and so I knew that he could not see the opening of the door, and I kept pushing it on steadily, steadily. I had my head in, and was about to open the lantern, when my thumb slipped upon the tin fastening, and the old man sprang up in bed, crying out –“Who’s there?” I kept quite still and said nothing. For a whole hour I did not move a muscle, and in the meantime I did not hear him lie down. He was still sitting up in the bed listening; –just as I have done, night after night, hearkening to the death watches in the wall.

Presently I heard a slight groan, and I knew it was the groan of mortal terror. It was not a groan of pain or of grief –oh, no! –it was the low stifled sound that arises from the bottom of the soul when overcharged with awe. I knew the sound well. Many a night, just at midnight, when all the world slept, it has welled up from my own bosom, deepening, with its dreadful echo, the terrors that distracted me. I say I knew it well. I knew what the old man felt, and pitied him, although I chuckled at heart. I knew that he had been lying awake ever since the first slight noise, when he had turned in the bed. His fears had been ever since growing upon him. He had been trying to fancy them causeless, but could not. He had been saying to himself –“It is nothing but the wind in the chimney –it is only a mouse crossing the floor,” or “It is merely a cricket which has made a single chirp.” Yes, he had been trying to comfort himself with these suppositions: but he had found all in vain. All in vain; because Death, in approaching him had stalked with his black shadow before him, and enveloped the victim. And it was the mournful influence of the unperceived shadow that caused him to feel –although he neither saw nor heard –to feel the presence of my head within the room.

When I had waited a long time, very patiently, without hearing him lie down, I resolved to open a little –a very, very little crevice in the lantern. So I opened it –you cannot imagine how stealthily, stealthily –until, at length a simple dim ray, like the thread of the spider, shot from out the crevice and fell full upon the vulture eye. It was open –wide, wide open –and I grew furious as I gazed upon it. I saw it with perfect distinctness –all a dull blue, with a hideous veil over it that chilled the very marrow in my bones; but I could see nothing else of the old man’s face or person: for I had directed the ray as if by instinct, precisely upon the damned spot. And have I not told you that what you mistake for madness is but over-acuteness of the sense? –now, I say, there came to my ears a low, dull, quick sound, such as a watch makes when enveloped in cotton. I knew that sound well, too. It was the beating of the old man’s heart. It increased my fury, as the beating of a drum stimulates the soldier into courage.

But even yet I refrained and kept still. I scarcely breathed. I held the lantern motionless. I tried how steadily I could maintain the ray upon the eve. Meantime the hellish tattoo of the heart increased. It grew quicker and quicker, and louder and louder every instant. The old man’s terror must have been extreme! It grew louder, I say, louder every moment! –do you mark me well I have told you that I am nervous: so I am. And now at the dead hour of the night, amid the dreadful silence of that old house, so strange a noise as this excited me to uncontrollable terror. Yet, for some minutes longer I refrained and stood still. But the beating grew louder, louder! I thought the heart must burst. And now a new anxiety seized me –the sound would be heard by a neighbour! The old man’s hour had come! With a loud yell, I threw open the lantern and leaped into the room. He shrieked once –once only. In an instant I dragged him to the floor, and pulled the heavy bed over him. I then smiled gaily, to find the deed so far done. But, for many minutes, the heart beat on with a muffled sound. This, however, did not vex me; it would not be heard through the wall. At length it ceased. The old man was dead. I removed the bed and examined the corpse. Yes, he was stone, stone dead. I placed my hand upon the heart and held it there many minutes. There was no pulsation. He was stone dead. His eye would trouble me no more.

If still you think me mad, you will think so no longer when I describe the wise precautions I took for the concealment of the body. The night waned, and I worked hastily, but in silence. First of all I dismembered the corpse. I cut off the head and the arms and the legs. I then took up three planks from the flooring of the chamber, and deposited all between the scantlings. I then replaced the boards so cleverly, so cunningly, that no human eye –not even his –could have detected anything wrong. There was nothing to wash out –no stain of any kind –no blood-spot whatever. I had been too wary for that. A tub had caught all –ha! ha! When I had made an end of these labors, it was four o’clock –still dark as midnight. As the bell sounded the hour, there came a knocking at the street door. I went down to open it with a light heart, –for what had I now to fear? There entered three men, who introduced themselves, with perfect suavity, as officers of the police. A shriek had been heard by a neighbour during the night; suspicion of foul play had been aroused; information had been lodged at the police office, and they (the officers) had been deputed to search the premises. I smiled, –for what had I to fear? I bade the gentlemen welcome. The shriek, I said, was my own in a dream. The old man, I mentioned, was absent in the country. I took my visitors all over the house. I bade them search — search well. I led them, at length, to his chamber. I showed them his treasures, secure, undisturbed. In the enthusiasm of my confidence, I brought chairs into the room, and desired them here to rest from their fatigues, while I myself, in the wild audacity of my perfect triumph, placed my own seat upon the very spot beneath which reposed the corpse of the victim.

The officers were satisfied. My manner had convinced them. I was singularly at ease. They sat, and while I answered cheerily, they chatted of familiar things. But, ere long, I felt myself getting pale and wished them gone. My head ached, and I fancied a ringing in my ears: but still they sat and still chatted. The ringing became more distinct: –It continued and became more distinct: I talked more freely to get rid of the feeling: but it continued and gained definiteness –until, at length, I found that the noise was not within my ears. No doubt I now grew very pale; –but I talked more fluently, and with a heightened voice. Yet the sound increased –and what could I do? It was a low, dull, quick sound –much such a sound as a watch makes when enveloped in cotton. I gasped for breath –and yet the officers heard it not. I talked more quickly –more vehemently; but the noise steadily increased. I arose and argued about trifles, in a high key and with violent gesticulations; but the noise steadily increased. Why would they not be gone? I paced the floor to and fro with heavy strides, as if excited to fury by the observations of the men –but the noise steadily increased. Oh God! what could I do? I foamed –I raved –I swore! I swung the chair upon which I had been sitting, and grated it upon the boards, but the noise arose over all and continually increased. It grew louder –louder –louder! And still the men chatted pleasantly, and smiled. Was it possible they heard not? Almighty God! –no, no! They heard! –they suspected! –they knew! –they were making a mockery of my horror!-this I thought, and this I think. But anything was better than this agony! Anything was more tolerable than this derision! I could bear those hypocritical smiles no longer! I felt that I must scream or die! and now –again! –hark! louder! louder! louder! louder!

“Villains!” I shrieked, “dissemble no more! I admit the deed! –tear up the planks! here, here! –It is the beating of his hideous heart!”

SOURCE:  https://www.poemuseum.org/the-tell-tale-heart

NO RESPONSE

READING FOR ENJOYMENT ONLY

CP 03

Class Dismissed

By WALTER KIRN  (NYT FEB). 25, 2010

According to the unwritten constitution that governs ordinary American life and makes possible a shared pop culture that even new immigrants can jump right into after a few movies and a trip to the mall, the senior year of public high school is less a climactic academic experience than an occasion for oafish goofing off, chronic truancy, random bullying, sloppy dancing in rented formalwear and interludes of moody, wan philosophizing (often at sunrise while still half-drunk and staring off at a misty river or the high-school parking lot) about the looming bummer of adulthood. In films like “Ferris Bueller’s Day Off,” “Dazed and Confused” and “High School Musical 3,” senior year is a do-little sabbatical from what is presented as the long dull labor of acquiring knowledge, honing skills and internalizing social norms. It’s a spree, senior year, that discharges built-up tensions. It’s an adolescent Mardi Gras. And it’s not an indulgence but an entitlement. Remember that line in your yearbook? Seniors rule! And they rule not because they’ve accomplished much, necessarily (aside from surviving to age 18 or so and not dropping out or running away from home), but because it’s tradition, and seniors crave tradition. They crave it because they know, deep down, they’re lost, and tradition helps them hide this fear. From juniors.

This year of licensed irresponsibility, this two-semester recurring national holiday, was threatened recently in Utah by a Republican legislator’s proposal to do away with 12th grade entirely. The idea was advanced as a budget-cutting measure — a way to shave millions from the cash-strapped state’s expense sheet — and it called forth the sort of instant, intense hostility that often signals that an inspired notion, truly innovative, truly new, has, by some miracle, entered politics. The proposal drew scorn from teachers and students alike (another tribute to its possible genius) and swiftly spread across the news wires, eliciting such hostility and controversy that its sponsor flinched. Aware, perhaps, that his offbeat plan was drawing unwelcome attention to a state that has spent the modern era in a permanent defensive crouch thanks to a Mormon religious culture that many view as joyless and eccentric, the lawmaker suggested that 12th grade — that ritual time out from the march of time itself — be made optional rather than nonexistent.

But did he compromise too readily? For many American high-school seniors, especially the soberest and most studious, senior year is a holding pattern, a redundancy, a way of running out the clock on a game that has already been won. When winter vacation rolls around, many of them, thanks to college early-admissions programs, know all they need to about their futures and have no more reason to hang around the schoolhouse than prehistoric fish had need for water once they grew limbs and could crawl out of the oceans. As for students who aren’t headed to four-year colleges but two-year community colleges or vocational schools, why not just get started early and read “Moby Dick” for pleasure, if they wish, rather than to earn a grade that they don’t need? Kids who plan to move right into the labor force are in the same position. They may as well spend the whole year in detention — which some of them, bored and restless, end up doing. Twelfth grade, for the sorts of students I’ve just described, amounts to a fidgety waiting period that practically begs for descents into debauchery and concludes in a big dumb party under a mirror ball that spins in place like the minds of those beneath it.

It’s not just one Utah lawmaker who has noticed this. The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation has, too, it seems. In the interest of speeding students on their way to productive, satisfying careers, the foundation intends to give a $1.5 million grant to a project organized by the nonprofit National Center on Education and the Economy. The goal is to help certain students leapfrog the keg party and go directly from 10th grade to community colleges after passing a battery of tests. The goal is not to save money but precious time, and the program is modeled on systems now in place in Denmark, Finland, France and Singapore — countries whose young folk, in many cases, speak English more grammatically than a lot of American high-school seniors do. One of the fledgling program’s backers, Terry Holliday, Kentucky’s commissioner of education, calls the program’s approach “move on when ready.” Compared with the prevailing current system, which might be termed “move on when all your friends do” or “move on when stir-crazy” or just “move on,” it seems both more pragmatic and humane, not to mention more likely to raise the G.D.P.

If senior year were to vanish from our high schools, either completely or in part, would its infamous excesses, feats of sloth, dances and stretches of absenteeism shift to junior year? To some degree. But what also might happen is that the education process, if it was shortened and compressed some, might help kids think more clearly about their paths in life and set out on them on the right foot instead of waiting to shape up later on. And what would they miss, really, under such a system? As someone who left high school a year early thanks to an offer from a progressive college that I didn’t seek but hungrily accepted (anything to escape those hours of “study hall” that we passed by folding sheets of paper until they couldn’t be folded any tighter, at which point we flicked them at one another’s heads), I guess I wouldn’t know. But I did learn from my visits home that my former classmates’ senior years did them few favors maturationwise, other than to make one an unwed mother and a couple of them into victims of major car collisions. That’s why, to my mind, Utah should feel free to ax senior year, bank the savings and see what happens. My hunch is that nothing will happen. Nothing much. Just the loss of a year when nothing much happens anyhow.

SOURCE:  https://www.nytimes.com/2010/02/28/magazine/28FOB-wwln-t.html

RESPONSES

1.  Identify the Main Point of this essay. (What is its thesis statement? What is its conclusion?)

2. Briefly summarize this essay.

3.  What rhetorical appeal does this essay mainly invoke (draw on)? Offer supporting textual evidence.

4.  Do you agree with the author’s main point? Explain.

5.  What are the benefits and problems to students, their families and to the local community of students being allowed to test out of 11th/12th Grade if they have a college willing to enroll them early? (Create a chart of positives and negatives of testing to those particular groups.)

6.  Write a paragraph-long response to the author of this essay that reflects your feeling on his idea.

CP 04

THE ARGUMENT (PERSUASIVE) ESSAY

The argument essay is the most common type of writing assignment that college students will encounter throughout their academic careers. While there are different variations of the argument essay, the overall foundation is always the same: the writer is tasked with investigating an issue, taking a stand on the issue, and finding and incorporating a multitude of evidence in a logical manner to support the overall claim.

Most of us have experience with arguing, but an argumentative essay is quite different than a verbal argument that arises out of the blue. Verbal arguments often become heated and unreasonable, while the goal of an argumentative essay is the opposite: the argument must be specific, reasoned, detailed and supported with a variety of evidence. Furthermore, a verbal argument often focuses on who is right regarding a specific issue, while a well-written, researched argument essay focuses on what is the right side of a particular issue. In short, an argument essay must be logical from beginning to end.

The following are important elements of a good argument essay:

  • Create a clear, firm, and debatable thesis. An effective thesis statement is an important foundational element of any essay, but it is of even greater importance in an argument essay. The reader needs to know exactly what the argument is and why it is important; there can be no confusion.
  • Provide the necessary background information on the topic. While an argument essay isn’t the same as a research essay, a bit of background information is often needed early in the essay to understand the argument. For example, if the writer is arguing that a certain amendment to the state constitution should be passed, it is probably necessary to describe what changes the amendment would make and whether or not a similar amendment has been proposed at some point.
  • Focus on organization and transitions. While transitions are important in any type of essay, they are particularly important in an argument essay. This is because the argument essay involves multiple reasons and evidence to support the overall thesis, and counter arguments are often discussed and refuted as well. 

 
Argument essays can be organized in a variety of ways. Regardless of the order in which it is organized, all argument essays should explain and support several reasons why the argument is valid, as well as explain and refute several opposing arguments offered by the other side. All writers will benefit from creating an outline to organize all of the information that will be presented, and this benefit becomes even greater with longer argument essays.  

  • Perform effective and thorough research. Most argumentative essays require incorporating research into the essay.  If this is the case with your essay, make sure to perform a significant amount of research before fully committing to a topic. This is important because you need to make sure there are enough credible sources that can be used in your essay. You don’t want to commit to a topic and begin writing the essay only to later discover that you can’t find enough quality sources to make the topic work.
  • Incorporate logos, pathos, and ethos. Logos is a term that refers to the use of logic in a debate. As a writer, the use of logos should be primary, should appear throughout the essay, and it is the best way to convince someone to adopt a particular stance on any issue. It is also important to avoid using logical fallacies. While logos should be the primary target, pathos – which is the use of emotion – can also be incorporated. Pathos means getting the reader emotionally involved in the argument so that the reader is open to further persuasion. One of the best places to use pathos is in the introduction. Ethos – the use of credibility – is also important. The best way for writers to incorporate ethos is by addressing counterarguments and using credible sources. Additionally, taking a reasonable stand on the issue (as opposed to an extreme one) will also lead to more credibility.

SOURCE: FROM: https://www.aims.edu/student/online-writing-lab/understanding-writing/argument.php

CP 05
Definition of perspective A particular perspective is a particular way of thinking about something, especially one that is influenced by your beliefs or experiences.  

POINT OF VIEW:  IMAGE 1

1. WHAT DO YOU SEE? 2. WHAT DO YOU THINK THE BOY IN THE BACKGROUND IS SEEING? EXPLAIN 3. IS THE SOLDIER DOING ANYTHING WRONG? EXPLAIN.


POINT OF VIEW: IMAGE 2

1. WHAT DO YOU SEE? 2. WHAT IS THE DIFFERENCE IN PERSPECTIVE BETWEEN SAYING PEOPLE GOT THEIR FOOD BY “LOOTING” (STEALING) IT OR BY “FINDING” IT? 3. DO YOU THINK EITHER OF THESE PICTURES ARE UNFAIR TO A PARTICULAR RACE?  EXPLAIN.
CP 06

IN PRAISE OF THE F WORD

BY MARY SHERRY ON 5/5/91 AT 8:00 PM/ SPORT

Tens of thousands of 18-year-olds will graduate this year and be handed meaningless diplomas. These diplomas won’t look any different from those awarded their luckier classmates. Their validity will be questioned only when their employers discover that these graduates are semiliterate.

Eventually a fortunate few will find their way into educational-repair shops–adult-literacy programs, such as the one where I teach basic grammar and writing. There, high-school graduates and high-school dropouts pursuing graduate-equivalency certificates will learn the skills they should have learned in school. They will also discover they have been cheated by our educational system.

As I teach, I learn a lot about our schools. Early in each session I ask my students to write about an unpleasant experience they had in school. No writers’ block here! “I wish someone would have had made me stop doing drugs and made me study.” “I liked to party and no one seemed to care.” “I was a good kid and didn’t cause any trouble, so they just passed me along even though I didn’t read and couldn’t write.” And so on.

I am your basic do-gooder, and prior to teaching this class I blamed the poor academic skills our kids have today on drugs, divorce and other impediments to concentration necessary for doing well in school. But, as I rediscover each time I walk into the classroom, before a teacher can expect students to concentrate, he has to get their attention, no matter what distractions may be at hand. There are many ways to do this, and they have much to do with teaching style. However, if style alone won’t do it, there is another way to show who holds the winning hand in the classroom. That is to reveal the trump card of failure.

I will never forget a teacher who played that card to get the attention of one of my children. Our youngest, a world class charmer, did little to develop his intellectual talents but always got by. Until Mrs. Stifter.

Our son was a high-school senior when he had her for English. “He sits in the back of the room talking to his friends,” she told me. “Why don’t you move him to the front row?” I urged, believing the embarrassment would get him to settle down. Mrs. Stifter looked at me steely-eyed over her glasses. “I don’t move seniors,” she said. “I flunk them.” I was flustered. Our son’s academic life flashed before my eyes. No teacher had ever threatened him with that before. I regained my composure and managed to say that I thought she was right. By the time I got home I was feeling pretty good about this. It was a radical approach for these times, but, well, why not? “She’s going to flunk you,” I told my son. I did not discuss it any further. Suddenly English became a priority in his life. He finished out the semester with an A.

I know one example doesn’t make a case, but at night I see a parade of students who are angry and resentful for having been passed along until they could no longer even pretend to keep up. Of average intelligence or better, they eventually quit school, concluding they were too dumb to finish. “I should have been held back,” is a comment I hear frequently. Even sadder are those students who are high-school graduates who say to me after a few weeks of class, “I don’t know how I ever got a high-school diploma.”

Passing students who have not mastered the work cheats them and the employers who expect graduates to have basic skills. We excuse this dishonest behavior by saying kids can’t learn if they come from terrible environments. No one seems to stop to think that–no matter what environments they come from–most kids don’t put school first on their list unless they perceive something is at stake. They’d rather be sailing.

Many students I see at night could give expert testimony on unemployment, chemical dependency, abusive relationships. In spite of these difficulties, they have decided to make education a priority. They are motivated by the desire for a better job or the need to hang on to the one they’ve got. They have a healthy fear of failure.

People of all ages can rise above their problems, but they need to have a reason to do so. Young people generally don’t have the maturity to value education in the same way my adult students value it. But fear of failure, whether economic or academic, can motivate both.

Flunking as a regular policy has just as much merit today as it did two generations ago. We must review the threat of flunking and see it as it really is–a positive teaching tool. It is an expression of confidence by both teachers and parents that the students have the ability to learn the material presented to them. However, making it work again would take a dedicated, caring conspiracy between teachers and parents. It would mean facing the tough reality that passing kids who haven’t learned the material–while it might save them grief for the short term–dooms them to long-term illiteracy. It would mean that teachers would have to follow through on their threats, and parents would have to stand behind them, knowing their children’s best interests are indeed at stake. This means no more doing Scott’s assignments for him because he might fail. No more passing Jodi because she’s such a nice kid.

This is a policy that worked in the past and can work today. A wise teacher, with the support of his parents, gave our son the opportunity to succeed–or fail. It’s time we return this choice to all students

SOURCE:  https://www.newsweek.com/praise-f-word-203860

RESPONSES

1.  Identify the Main Point of this essay. (What is its thesis statement? What is its conclusion?)

2. Briefly summarize this essay.

3.  What rhetorical appeal does this essay mainly invoke (draw on)? Offer supporting textual evidence.

4.  Do you agree with the author’s main point? Explain.

5.  What are the benefits and problems to students, their families and to the local community of students being allowed to repeatedly fail in high school? (Create a chart of positives and negatives of testing out to those particular groups.)

6.  Write a paragraph-long response to the author of this essay that reflects your feeling on her idea.

CP 07

Cinderella, by the Brothers Grimm 

The wife of a rich man fell sick, and as she felt that her end was drawing near, she called her only daughter to her bedside and said, dear child, be good and pious, and then the good God will always protect you, and I will look down on you from heaven and be near you.  Thereupon she closed her eyes and departed.  Every day the maiden went out to her mother’s grave, and wept, and she remained pious and good.  When winter came the snow spread a white sheet over the grave, and by the time the spring sun had drawn it off again, the man had taken another wife.

The woman had brought with her into the house two daughters, who were beautiful and fair of face, but vile and black of heart. Now began a bad time for the poor step-child.  Is the stupid goose to sit in the parlor with us, they said.  He who wants to eat bread must earn it.  Out with the kitchen-wench.  They took her pretty clothes away from her, put an old grey bedgown on her, and gave her wooden shoes.  Just look at the proud princess, how decked out she is, they cried, and laughed, and led her into the kitchen.

There she had to do hard work from morning till night, get up before daybreak, carry water, light fires, cook and wash.  Besides this, the sisters did her every imaginable injury – they mocked her and emptied her peas and lentils into the ashes, so that she was forced to sit and pick them out again.  In the evening when she had worked till she was weary she had no bed to go to, but had to sleep by the hearth in the cinders.  And as on that account she always looked dusty and dirty, they called her Cinderella.

It happened that the father was once going to the fair, and he asked his two step-daughters what he should bring back for them. Beautiful dresses, said one, pearls and jewels, said the second. And you,  Cinderella, said he, what will you have.  Father break off for me the first branch which knocks against your hat on your way home.  So he bought beautiful dresses, pearls and jewels for his two step-daughters, and on his way home, as he was riding through a green thicket, a hazel twig brushed against him and knocked off his hat.  Then he broke off the branch and took it with him.  When he reached home he gave his step-daughters the things which they had wished for, and to Cinderella he gave the branch from the hazel-bush.  Cinderella thanked him, went to her mother’s grave and planted the branch on it, and wept so much that the tears fell down on it and watered it.  And it grew and became a handsome tree. Thrice a day Cinderella went and sat beneath it, and wept and prayed, and a little white bird always came on the tree, and if Cinderella expressed a wish, the bird threw down to her what she had wished for.    

It happened, however, that the king gave orders for a festival which was to last three days, and to which all the beautiful young girls in the country were invited, in order that his son might choose himself a  bride.  When the two step-sisters heard that they too were to appear among the number, they were delighted, called Cinderella and said, comb our hair for us, brush our shoes and fasten our buckles, for we are going to the wedding at the king’s palace.

Cinderella obeyed, but wept, because she too would have liked to go with them to the dance, and begged her step-mother to allow her to do so.  You go, Cinderella, said she, covered in dust and dirt as you are, and would go to the festival.  You have no clothes and shoes, and yet would dance.  As, however, Cinderella went on asking, the step-mother said at last, I have emptied a dish of lentils into the ashes for you, if you have picked them out again in two hours, you shall go with us.  The maiden went through the back-door into the garden, and called, you tame pigeons, you turtle-doves, and all you birds beneath the sky, come and help me to pick

     the good into the pot,

     the bad into the crop.

Then two white pigeons came in by the kitchen window, and afterwards the turtle-doves, and at last all the birds beneath the sky, came whirring and crowding in, and alighted amongst the ashes. And the pigeons nodded with their heads and began pick, pick, pick, pick, and the rest began also pick, pick, pick, pick, and gathered all the good grains into the dish.  Hardly had one hour passed before they had finished, and all flew out again.  Then the girl took the dish to her step-mother, and was glad, and believed that now she would be allowed to go with them to the festival.

But the step-mother said, no, Cinderella, you have no clothes and you cannot dance.  You would only be laughed at.  And as Cinderella wept at this, the step-mother said, if you can pick two dishes of lentils out of the ashes for me in one hour, you shall go with us.  And she thought to herself, that she most certainly cannot do again.  When the step-mother had emptied the two dishes of lentils amongst the ashes, the maiden went through the back-door into the garden and cried, you tame pigeons, you turtle-doves, and all you birds beneath the sky, come and help me to pick

     the good into the pot,

     the bad into the crop.

Then two white pigeons came in by the kitchen-window, and afterwards the turtle-doves, and at length all the birds beneath the sky, came whirring and crowding in, and alighted amongst the ashes.  And the doves nodded with their heads and began pick, pick, pick, pick, and the others began also pick, pick, pick, pick, and gathered all the good seeds into the dishes, and before half an hour was over they had already finished, and all flew out again.

Then the maiden was delighted, and believed that she might now go with them to the wedding.  But the step-mother said, all this will not help.  You cannot go with us, for you have no clothes and can not dance.  We should be ashamed of you.  On this she turned her back on Cinderella, and hurried away with her two proud daughters.

As no one was now at home, Cinderella went to her mother’s grave beneath the hazel-tree, and cried –

     shiver and quiver, little tree,

     silver and gold throw down over me.

Then the bird threw a gold and silver dress down to her, and slippers embroidered with silk and silver. She put on the dress with all speed, and went to the wedding.  Her step-sisters and the step-mother however did not know her, and thought she must be a foreign princess, for she looked so beautiful in the golden dress.

They never once thought of Cinderella, and believed that she was sitting at home in the dirt, picking lentils out of the ashes.  The prince approached her, took her by the hand and danced with her.

He would dance with no other maiden, and never let loose of her hand, and if anyone else came to invite her, he said, this is my partner. She danced till it was evening, and then she wanted to go home. But the king’s son said, I will go with you and bear you company, for he wished to see to whom the beautiful maiden belonged. She escaped from him, however, and sprang into the pigeon-house.  The king’s son waited until her father came, and then he told him that the unknown maiden had leapt into the pigeon-house.  The old man thought, can it be Cinderella.  And they had to bring him an axe and a pickaxe that he might hew the pigeon-house to pieces, but no one was inside it.  And when they got home Cinderella lay in her dirty clothes among the ashes, and a dim little oil-lamp was burning on the mantle-piece, for Cinderella had jumped quickly down from the back of the pigeon-house and had run to the little hazel-tree, and there she had taken off her beautiful clothes and laid them on the grave, and the bird had taken them away again, and then she had seated herself in the kitchen amongst the ashes in her grey gown.

Next day when the festival began afresh, and her parents and the step-sisters had gone once more, Cinderella went to the hazel-tree and said –

     shiver and quiver, my little tree,

     silver and gold throw down over me.

Then the bird threw down a much more beautiful dress than on the preceding day. And when Cinderella appeared at the wedding in this dress, everyone was astonished at her beauty.  The king’s son had waited until she came, and instantly took her by the hand and danced with no one but her.  When others came and invited her, he said, this is my partner.  When evening came she wished to leave, and the king’s son followed her and wanted to see into which house she went.  But she sprang away from him, and into the garden behind the house.  Therein stood a beautiful tall tree on which hung the most magnificent pears.  She clambered so nimbly between the branches like a squirrel that the king’s son did not know where she was gone.  He waited until her father came, and said to him, the unknown maiden has escaped from me, and I believe she has climbed up the pear-tree.  The father thought, can it be Cinderella.  And had an axe brought and cut the tree down, but no one was on it.  And when they got into the kitchen, Cinderella lay there among the ashes, as usual, for she had jumped down on the other side of the tree, had taken the beautiful dress to the bird on the little hazel-tree, and put on her grey gown.

On the third day, when the parents and sisters had gone away, Cinderella went once more to her mother’s grave and said to the little tree –

     shiver and quiver, my little tree,

     silver and gold throw down over me.

And now the bird threw down to her a dress which was more splendid and magnificent than any she had yet had, and the slippers were golden.  And when she went to the festival in the dress, no one knew how to speak for astonishment.  The king’s son danced with her only, and if any one invited her to dance, he said this is my partner.

When evening came, Cinderella wished to leave, and the king’s son was anxious to go with her, but she escaped from him so quickly that he could not follow her.  The king’s son, however, had employed a ruse, and had caused the whole staircase to be smeared with pitch, and there, when she ran down, had the maiden’s left slipper remained stuck.  The king’s son picked it up, and it was small and dainty, and all golden.  Next morning, he went with it to the father, and said to him, no one shall be my wife but she whose foot this golden slipper fits.  Then were the two sisters glad, for they had pretty feet.  The eldest went with the shoe into her room and wanted to try it on, and her mother stood by.  But she could not get her big toe into it, and the shoe was too small for her.  Then her mother gave her a knife and said, cut the toe off, when you are queen you will have no more need to go on foot.  The maiden cut the toe off, forced the foot into the shoe, swallowed the pain, and went out to the king’s son.  Then he took her on his horse as his bride and rode away with her.  They were obliged, however, to pass the grave, and there, on the hazel-tree, sat the two pigeons and cried –

     turn and peep, turn and peep,

     there’s blood within the shoe,

     the shoe it is too small for her,

     the true bride waits for you.

Then he looked at her foot and saw how the blood was trickling from it.  He turned his horse round and took the false bride home again, and said she was not the true one, and that the other sister was to put the shoe on.  Then this one went into her chamber and got her toes safely into the shoe, but her heel was too large.  So her mother gave her a knife and said,  cut a bit off your heel, when you are queen you will have no more need to go on foot.  The maiden cut a bit off her heel, forced her foot into the shoe, swallowed the pain, and went out to the king’s son.  He took her on his horse as his bride, and rode away with her, but when they passed by the hazel-tree, the two pigeons sat on it and cried –

     turn and peep, turn and peep,

     there’s blood within the shoe,

     the shoe it is too small for her,

     the true bride waits for you.

He looked down at her foot and saw how the blood was running out of her shoe, and how it had stained her white stocking quite red.  Then he turned his horse and took the false bride home again.  This also is not the right one, said he, have you no other daughter.  No, said the man, there is still a little stunted kitchen-wench which my late wife left behind her, but she cannot possibly be the bride.  The king’s son said he was to send her up to him, but the mother answered, oh, no, she is much too dirty, she cannot show herself.  But he absolutely insisted on it, and Cinderella had to be called.  She first washed her hands and face clean, and then went and bowed down before the king’s son, who gave her the golden shoe.  Then she seated herself on a stool, drew her foot out of the heavy wooden shoe, and put it into the slipper, which fitted like a glove.  And when she rose up and the king’s son looked at her face he recognized the beautiful maiden who had danced with him and cried, that is the true bride.  The step-mother and the two sisters were horrified and became pale with rage, he, however, took Cinderella on his horse and rode away with her.  As they passed by the hazel-tree, the two white doves cried –

     turn and peep, turn and peep,

     no blood is in the shoe,

     the shoe is not too small for her,

     the true bride rides with you,

and when they had cried that, the two came flying down and placed themselves on Cinderella’s shoulders, one on the right, the other on the left, and remained sitting there.

Cinderella Responses 1.  What is the main point of this story?;  2.  Briefly summarize the story; 3.  Why would Disney and others not offer its audience the original Cinderella story, instead of changing it to be so nice and friendly?; 4.  Do you see Cinderella as a strong or a weak person?  Explain; 5.  How would you respond to having sisters like Cinderella has?; 6.  Where is the main action in this story? Explain; 7.  What statement, if any, does Cinderella make about families and family relationships?; 8.  Is Cinderella a kind of feminist?  Explain.  

When the wedding with the king’s son was to be celebrated, the two false sisters came and wanted to get into favor with Cinderella and share her good fortune.  When the betrothed couple went to church, the elder was at the right side and the younger at the left, and the pigeons pecked out one eye from each of them.  Afterwards as they came back the elder was at the left, and the younger at the right, and then the pigeons pecked out the other eye from each.  And thus, for their wickedness and falsehood, they were punished with blindness all their days.

CP 08

SPOOF ARTICLE  

From the ONION: Since The Beginning Of Time, Mankind Has Discussed What It Did On Summer Vacation

Jeremy Ryan                                                                          9/15/10 8:00am

SEE MORE: EDUCATIONFor as far back as historians can go, summer vacations have been celebrated by people everywhere as a time for rest and relaxation. Many advancements have been made in summer breaks since these early times, but it is also true that many different traditions have lived on and continue to remain with us today. This is why, since the beginning of time, mankind has discussed what it did on its summer vacation.

This is what I intend to prove within the course of this essay.

The dictionary defines summer as “the season between spring and autumn” and a vacation as “a break or intermission.” These definitions were very true in the ancient past, as well, when summer was the time for hanging out while the crops grew. They sang bountiful songs of harvest and carved wooden games and puzzles to play with that are in many ways similar to the Xboxes and PlayStations of today but not as good. This is how summer vacation started.

As people know, the discussing of the summer vacation is a tradition as old as summer vacation itself is. In the early days before the invention of writing, stories of summer fun were told in caves. Each kid had to memorize their essay in their head because there was no way to record it. The invention of paper by the Chinese of course gave us the ability to not only write down what happened on our summer vacations but also hand them into our teacher for grades. Later on, Egyptian children would gather on the first day of their Egyptian school and they would all stand up in front of the class and talk about how they spent their summer at sleep-away camp building pyramids and making mummies.

Since then, the major libraries of history have contained many chronicles of bygone summer days. How were these days spent? For instance, the Romans were famous for spending nearly every day at the pool. Native American children would often be allowed to sleep in until almost noon and then spend the rest of the day watching the fire. And the Mayans created famous stone carvings that showed how little brothers followed them around all day and wanted to play basketball even though they sucked and didn’t understand the rules of the game.

These and other examples prove my original point that summer vacation has been very important in history.

Also, my friend Justin’s dad said there used to be a big farmer’s field where the mall is now, so this proves my point from before that it used to be all about farming.

It is also true that early man faced many hardships on his summer vacation, including many trials and tribulations such as saber-toothed tigers, and the Civil War much later. Luckily, we have invented many things that make summer vacations even easier and better today than they were before. It was with the invention of the automobile that summer vacation really came into what it is today, such as the example of making one’s mom take you to the water park, which is something that has been with us since the dawn of man. The car allows her to do so without having to spend her whole day transporting you back and forth on horseback or possibly even camelback. Thus going to the water park can be a weekly or interweekly occurrence rather than simply once a season.

But what will the future hold for the summer vacation and the essays we write about it? I believe that it will continue to evolve as mankind does. However, many things will remain constant, such as weeklong trips to Aunt Ginny’s house in Dubuque, fun fair festivals that sound better than they really are, and of course your friend Justin breaking his leg the first week of vacation so he cannot do anything fun. But things may also change. Perhaps trips to the air museum could be directly uploaded into your mind so instead of taking all day it could only take one minute, or maybe there will be teleporting so you could go anywhere for vacation.

In conclusion, summer vacations will probably always be cool.

SPOOF ARTICLE RESPONSES 1.  How can we tell that this is a spoof (not serious) article? 2.  Does it have a main point? Explain. 3.  Is it a serious point? Explain. 4.  Write a spoof account of something that you like to make fun of.  

SOURCE:  https://www.theonion.com/since-the-beginning-of-time-mankind-has-discussed-what-1819584687

CP 09

Denotation and Connotation

A word’s denotation is its dictionary definition. A word can also make people feel

or think a certain way. These feelings and ideas are the connotations of a word.

Words with the same meaning can have different “shades of meaning”—that is,

they can be understood differently.

Positive connotation: Being on the track team has made Alan slender and

lean. (attractively thin)

Neutral connotation: Being on the track team has made Alan thin.

Negative connotation: Being on the track team has made Alan skinny and

scrawny. (unattractively thin)

Be sure that the words you use have the right connotation as well as the right

denotation.

A. Identifying Positive and Negative Connotations

Each pair of phrases includes synonyms with different connotations. Put a + sign

next to the one with a positive connotation and a sign next to the one with a

negative connotation. Use a dictionary or thesaurus if needed.

Copyright © McDougal Littell Inc. VOCABULARY 45

Lesson

23

1. a powerful stink ________

a powerful aroma ________

2. a dynamic leader ________

a pushy leader ________

3. squandered his money ________

spent his money ________

4. a reckless plan ________

a daring plan ________

5. energetic children ________

wild children ________

6. answered with arrogance ________

answered with confidence ________

7. sloppy clothes ________

casual clothes ________

8. an aggressive attitude ________

a hostile attitude ________

9. an easygoing friend ________

a lazy friend ________

10. a thoughtful response ________

a calculated response ________

Denotation and Connotation More Practice

B. Connotations in Action

In the first paragraph below, circle the words that have a positive connotation. In

the second paragraph, circle the words that have a negative connotation. Use a

dictionary or thesaurus if needed.

Positive connotation:

Ms. Baxter has been a(n) (valuable, costly) employee of this company for

three years. In that time, she has expressed many (militant, strong) opinions.

Her methods of solving problems are sometimes (unusual, bizarre). In short,

she is a real (leader, show-off).

Negative connotation:

I was surprised to get a birthday gift from my Aunt Joanna. She is (an

inquisitive person, a real snoop), so she had asked many of my relatives

what I might like. I tore the (colorful, gaudy) paper off the package and found

a shirt made of (flimsy, delicate) material. It was covered with (detailed,

fussy) embroidery and (flashy, eye-catching) sequins. It certainly was a(n)

(strange, exotic) present.

C. Vocabulary Challenge

Replace each word with a synonym that has positive connotations. Then write a

sentence using the synonym correctly. Use a dictionary or thesaurus if needed.

1. nosy __________________

___________________________________________________________________________________

2. odd __________________

___________________________________________________________________________________

3. cheap __________________

___________________________________________________________________________________

4. overprotective __________________

___________________________________________________________________________________

5. glare __________________

___________________________________________________________________________________

Lesson

23

CP 10

The troubling case of the young Japanese reporter who  worked herself to death 

A young journalist’s grueling work schedule — including a single month with 159 hours of overtime and just two days off ­— triggered the heart failure that killed her at age 31, Japanese labor regulators ruled.

Authorities officially attributed Miwa Sado’s death to “karoshi” — the Japanese word for a death due to overwork — according to information released this week by NHK, the public broadcaster that employed her.

Sado, a political reporter, had been covering elections for Tokyo’s government and the national parliament in the months leading up to her death in 2013. She died three days after the elections for Japan’s upper house.

NHK had not released information regulators had compiled about the death until this week.

The determination that Sado’s death was caused by overworking has brought renewed scrutiny to the working culture in Japan, where hundreds, if not thousands of people are believed to work themselves to death every year.

One official with the public broadcaster told reporters her death was indicative of a “problem for our organization as a whole, including the labor system and how elections are covered.”

Japan’s working culture, where long hours and after-work social engagements are typical, dates back decades, as The Post’s Anna Fifield has reported:

It began in the 1970s, when wages were relatively low and employees wanted to maximize their earnings. It continued through the boom years of the 1980s, when Japan became the world’s second-largest economy, and everyone was on the juggernaut.

And it remained after the bubble burst in the late 1990s, when companies began restructuring and employees stayed at work to try to ensure they weren’t laid off.

Still, irregular workers — who worked without benefits or job security — were brought in, making the regular workers toil even harder.

Now, no one blinks an eyelid at 12-hour-plus days.

“In a Japanese workplace, overtime work is always there. It’s almost as if it is part of scheduled working hours,” said Koji Morioka, an emeritus professor at Kansai University who is on a committee of experts advising the government on ways to combat karoshi. “It’s not forced by anyone, but workers feel it like it’s compulsory.

The country classified 189 deaths from overwork in 2015 — 93 suicides and 96 from heart attacks, strokes and other illnesses related to overwork — though experts believe the actual number may be much higher.

In addition to long hours, vacation days routinely go unused: On average, employees used less than half of their leave time in 2015 — about nine days a year, according to the Guardian.

A study of 10,000 companies in Japan released last year found more than one-fifth exceeded an 80-hour per month overtime threshold. More than one in five Japanese workers work 49 hours or more each week, compared with 16.4 percent in the United States, 12.5 percent in Britain and 10.1 percent in Germany, according to the Associated Press.

In Sado’s case, 159 hours of overtime averages to more than 5.5 hours a day over the course of a 28-day month. According to the Asahi Shimbun, Sado was busy covering candidates and their supporters, shooting footage of speeches and attending meetings during the election.

“She was under circumstances that she could not secure enough days off due to responsibilities that required her to stay up very late,” said a release from labor regulators, according to the newspaper. “It can be inferred that she was in a state of accumulated fatigue and chronic sleep deprivation.”

Sado started work at the NHK in 2005, when she was in her early 20s, according to the Japan Times. NHK said it waited to make information about her death public out of deference to her family, reports said.

“Even today, four years after, we cannot accept our daughter’s death as a reality,” Sado’s parents said in a statement released by the broadcaster to Japanese media. “We hope that the sorrow of the bereaved family will never be wasted.”

The deaths of other young Japanese workers have brought renewed attention to the issue in recent years.

In 2015, the despondent messages left on Twitter by Matsuri Takahashi, a 24-year-old who was working more than 100 hours of overtime a month at an ad agency, drew wide attention after she killed herself by jumping from a company dormitory.

“I’m going to die. I’m so tired,” she wrote in one message.

The company’s president and chief executive later resigned, due in part to outcry over her death.Later that year, 34-year-old maintenance worker Kiyotaka Seriwaza killed himself after putting in 90-hour weeks at a company from which he had tried, unsuccessfully, to resign.

The government has been taking steps to change the culture around work to address the problem of karoshi, passing legislation with the goal of reducing the amount of workers working more than 60 hours a week and working to entice employees to use their paid vacation time.

Early this year, a government spokesman told Bloomberg News Japan needs to “end of the norm of long working hours so people can balance their lives with things like raising a child or taking care of the elderly.”

Companies have been joining the effort, taking steps to encourage workers to actually leave work, use their vacation days, and spend more time away from work.

Dentsu has begun shutting the lights off in its headquarters at 10 p.m., and now requires workers take at least five days off every six months. Japan Post Insurance, a life insurance company, shuts off its lights at 7:30 p.m. Yahoo Japan has been considering a four-day workweek.

Sado had sent an email in the weeks before her death that warned of the toll her work was taking on her, the Asahi Shimbun reported.

“I am too busy and stressed out and think about quitting my job at least once a day, but I guess I have to hang on,” she wrote, according to the newspaper.

She was discovered in her bed, holding her cellphone in her hand.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/worldviews/wp/2017/10/05/the-troubling-case-of-the-young-japanese-reporter-who-worked-herself-to-death/?utm_term=.3d58781cec0e

CP 11

Can Aptitude Tests Really Predict Employee Success? Posted by Georgina Clatworthy 

The use of aptitude and knowledge tests to screen potential job applicants has long been standard practice across many different sectors.  As such they have become an important and integral part of the overall interview process. 

These days, any job vacancy is likely to attract a large pool of potential candidates.  Pre-screening these applicants can help reduce the number to a more manageable size who will then go forward into a more rigorous screening phase.

The Accuracy of Aptitude Tests

Aptitude tests afford companies an opportunity to make a more informed decision when it comes to hiring.  With often more than one applicant applying for a position, the importance of being able to make comparisons can’t be underestimated.  The tests assess many factors which are very important in terms of choosing the right candidate.  They can assess an applicant’s ability to problem solve, reason, write coherently and get along with others.

In conjunction with the interview, the tests give a very accurate picture of a candidate’s potential to be successful in the position they are pursuing.  Different aptitude tests measure different qualities but in the end they all afford the interviewer valuable information that cannot be identified from the interview process alone.  However, the tests need to be designed with the actual vacancy in mind.  It makes sense to ensure the skills and knowledge you are testing is relevant to the position on offer, otherwise the results will be wholly inaccurate.

Providing the tests are applied correctly, they can be a representative measure of performance similar to actually placing that person in the job.

Types and Application of Aptitude Tests

The content of an aptitude test and the way in which it is delivered needs to be considered carefully.  Not only should the tests be considered from both a cost and time point of view, but also in terms of appropriateness to the job being offered.

Types of tests include:

Skills Tests:  Typically these are easy tasks relating to an important function of the job, such as keyboard/typing speeds or data entry.

Knowledge Tests:  These are designed to measure how much a candidate knows about a particular aspect of the job. A knowledge test should be based on a particular topic that is relevant to the job to ensure a candidate has the required level of knowledge.

Ability Tests:  Typically these tests are used to measure cognitive or mental ability.  Ability tests have been related to performance levels and are based on presenting candidates with workplace scenarios and asking them to explain what they would do in a given situation.

Personality Tests:  Many personality tests exist, but, the most commonly used in employment screening measures five basic factors of personality – (1) openness to experience, (2) extroversion, (3) agreeableness, (4) conscientiousness, and (5) emotional stability.  This test is often used for sales positions and there is evidence that personality testing can be used to predict performance. ¹

Typically, aptitude tests are delivered in a time controlled environment, either at the employer’s premises, or at a testing center operated by a third party who designs and administers the test.  Traditionally, they would be pencil and paper affairs or delivered via a PC.  However, these days many employers are turning to the internet to supply and administer aptitude tests.  There are numerous benefits to choosing internet based testing, including:

Convenience for the candidate, who can take the test from home without traveling to testing centers.

The ability to test large numbers of candidates at one time.

Real time reporting and faster results submission, meaning the process of screening candidates is faster.

Advantages of Aptitude Tests

There are certain advantages to administering aptitude tests in conjunction with the interview process:

Studies² have shown that overall the tests are quite accurate in predicting the potential for success.  There are further advantages too in using the tests to help identify the right candidate for the job, whether it is a new hire or a promotion.

The tests are also fairly accurate when it comes to assessing a person’s strengths and weaknesses.  Interviews alone may not provide the in-depth look at the candidate that is required, so the addition of an aptitude test offers greater insight into the candidate’s potential for success.

Aptitude tests can afford the candidate an opportunity to examine the types of skills the position calls for.  It is very important that the job applicant feel that they will be the right fit for the position.

Disadvantages of Aptitude Tests

Aptitude tests can be quite costly to both develop and administer.

The tests must be tailored to the various positions in the company.  Each job requires different skills and the tests must accurately reflect those needs.

It is also important to recognize that the tests are time consuming to administer and, at the risk of being trite, time is money.

One other extremely important thing to keep in mind is that the tests must be kept current and relevant.  Job descriptions and requirements change and the aptitude tests must change with a company’s evolving needs.

Aptitude tests may make the job applicant quite apprehensive and stressed and the interviewer must take into account the affect such a reaction will have on the outcome.  It is generally thought that the job applicant should be advised in advance that they will be required to take an aptitude test.

The Big Picture

Matching candidates to job vacancies often marks the beginning of what is known as employee-relationship-management (ERM).  Setting out how candidates will be evaluated and selected is integral to forming the basis of this relationship and can form the framework on which future performance will be measured.  Whilst a sound job description will help potential employees understand the responsibilities and expectations necessary to undertake the role, the application of knowledge and skills tests at an early stage can help identify future development goals.

RESPONSES (1- or 2-paragraph responses each)

  1. What is an aptitude test?
    1. Why do employers use them?
    1. Do you think aptitude tests provide a fair indication as to whether or not an applicant is suitable for a particular job? Explain.
CP 12

GUN CONTROL:  3 PROS AND 3 CONS

PROs (FOR GUN CONTROL)

PRO 1:

The Second Amendment is not an unlimited right to own guns. Gun control laws are just as old or older than the Second Amendment (ratified in 1791). Some examples of gun control throughout colonial America included criminalizing the transfer of guns to Catholics, slaves, indentured servants, and Native Americans; regulating the storage of gun powder in homes; banning loaded guns in Boston houses; and mandating participation in formal gathering of troops and door-to-door surveys about guns owned. [1] [2] In the June 26, 2008 District of Columbia et al. v. Heller US Supreme Court majority opinion, Justice Antonin Scalia, LLB, wrote, “Like most rights, the right secured by the Second Amendment is not unlimited. From Blackstone through the 19th-century cases, commentators and courts routinely explained that the right was not a right to keep and carry any weapon whatsoever in any manner whatsoever and for whatever purpose… nothing in our opinion should be taken to cast doubt on longstanding prohibitions on the possession of firearms by felons and the mentally ill, or laws forbidding the carrying of firearms in sensitive places such as schools and government buildings, or laws imposing conditions and qualifications on the commercial sale of arms.” [3] On June 9, 2016 the US Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals ruled 7-4 that “[t]he right of the general public to carry a concealed firearm in public is not, and never has been, protected by the Second Amendment,” thus upholding a law requiring a permitting process and “good cause” for concealed carry licenses in California. [145] [146]

PRO 2

More gun control laws would reduce gun deaths. There were 464,033 total gun deaths between 1999 and 2013: 270,237 suicides (58.2% of total deaths); 174,773 homicides (37.7%); and 9,983 unintentional deaths (2.2%). [4] Guns were the leading cause of death by homicide (66.6% of all homicides) and by suicide (52.2% of all suicides). Firearms were the 12th leading cause of all deaths, representing 1.3% of total deaths topping liver disease, hypertension, and Parkinson’s disease, as well as deaths from fires, drowning, and machinery accidents. [4] David Frum, Daily Beast and CNN contributor, stated, “American children under age 15 were nine times more likely to die of a gun accident than children in other advanced wealthy countries… About 200 Americans go to emergency rooms every day with gunshot wounds.” [5] A study published in the American Journal of Public Health found that “legal purchase of a handgun appears to be associated with a long-lasting increased risk of violent death” [6] According to a Mar. 10, 2016 Lancet study, implementing federal universal background checks could reduce firearm deaths by a projected 56.9%; background checks for ammunition purchases could reduce deaths by a projected 80.7%; and gun identification requirements could reduce deaths by a projected 82.5%. [148]

PRO 3

High-capacity magazines should be banned because they too often turn murder into mass murder. A Mother Jones investigation found that high-capacity magazines were used in at least 50% of the 62 mass shootings between 1982 and 2012. [7] When high-capacity magazines were used in mass shootings, the death rate rose 63% and the injury rate rose 156%. [8] David H. Chipman, Senior Vice President of Public Safety for ShotSpotter and former Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives (ATF) agent, stated that a high-capacity magazine “turns a killer into a killing machine.” [7] Some gang members use high-capacity magazines, such as 30 rounds or even 90 rounds, to compensate for lack of accuracy and maximize the chance to harm. [9]

CONS (AGAINST GUN CONTROL)

CON 1

The Second Amendment of the US Constitution protects individual gun ownership. The Second Amendment of the US Constitution reads, “A well-regulated militia, being necessary to the security of a free state, the right of the people to keep and bear arms, shall not be infringed.” Gun ownership is an American tradition older than the country itself and is protected by the Second Amendment; more gun control laws would infringe upon the right to bear arms. Justice Antonin Scalia, LLB, in the June 26, 2008 District of Columbia et al. v. Heller US Supreme Court majority opinion syllabus stated, “The Second Amendment protects an individual right to possess a firearm unconnected with service in a militia, and to use that arm for traditionally lawful purposes, such as self-defense within the home.” [3] The McDonald v. City of Chicago (2010) ruling also stated that the Second Amendment is an individual right. [51] Lawrence Hunter, Chairman of Revolution PAC, stated, “The Founders understood that the right to own and bear laws is as fundamental and as essential to maintaining liberty as are the rights of free speech, a free press, freedom of religion and the other protections against government encroachments on liberty delineated in the Bill of Rights.” [52]

CON 2

Gun control laws do not deter crime; gun ownership deters crime. A Nov. 26, 2013 study found that, between 1980 and 2009, “assault weapons bans did not significantly affect murder rates at the state level” and “states with restrictions on the carrying of concealed weapons had higher gun-related murders.” [103] While gun ownership doubled in the twentieth century, the murder rate decreased. [53] John R. Lott, Jr., PhD, author of More Guns, Less Crime: Understanding Crime and Gun Control Laws, stated, “States with the largest increases in gun ownership also have the largest drops in violent crimes… The effect on ‘shall-issue’ [concealed gun] laws on these crimes [where two or more people were killed] has been dramatic. When states passed these laws, the number of multiple-victim shootings declined by 84 percent. Deaths from these shootings plummeted on average by 90 percent and injuries by 82 percent.” [54] A Dec. 10, 2014 Pew survey found that 57% of people believe that owning a gun protects them from being victimized. [55] Journalist John Stossel explained, “Criminals don’t obey the law… Without the fear of retaliation from victims who might be packing heat, criminals in possession of these [illegal] weapons now have a much easier job… As the saying goes, ‘If guns are outlawed, only outlaws will have guns.'” [56]

CON 3

Gun control laws infringe upon the right to self-defense and deny people a sense of safety. According to the National Rifle Association (NRA), guns are used for self-defense 2.5 million times a year. [57] The police cannot protect everyone all of the time. 61% of men and 56% of women surveyed by Pew Research said that stricter gun laws would “make it more difficult for people to protect their homes and families.” [58] Nelson Lund, JD, PhD, Professor at George Mason University School of Law, stated, “The right to self-defense and to the means of defending oneself is a basic natural right that grows out of the right to life” and “many [gun control laws] interfere with the ability of law-abiding citizens to defend themselves against violent criminals.” [59] Constitutions in 37 US states protect the right to bear arms for self-defense, most with explicit language such as Alabama’s: “every citizen has a right to bear arms in defense of himself and the state.” [60] [61] Wayne LaPierre, Executive Vice President of the NRA, stated, “The only thing that stops a bad guy with a gun is a good guy with a gun.” [62]

SOURCE:  https://gun-control.procon.org/

WORKING IN PAIRS:  EACH PAIR SHOULD

1.  SUMMARIZE EACH OF THE 3 PROS AND 3 CONS OF GUN CONTROL LISTED BELOW

2. WRITE A SINGLE STATEMENT THAT INCLUDES WHAT YOU BELIEVE ARE THE MOST PERSUASIVE POINTS OF EVIDENCE ON THE PRO SIDE AND EXPLAIN YOUR CHOICE.

3. WRITE A SINGLE STATEMENT THAT INCLUDES WHAT YOU BELIEVE ARE THE MOST PERSUASIVE POINTS OF EVIDENCE ON THE CON SIDE AND EXPLAIN YOUR CHOICE.

CP 13


David  Whitley
Contact Reporter
Orlando Sentinel

Diane Tirado doesn’t bbelieve in giving credit where it’s not due. The school she used to work at apparently does.

Tirado says she was fired from her job at a Port St. Lucie K-8 school because she insisted on giving students zeros if they didn’t turn in an assignment.

The U.S. history teacher left a goodbye message to her eighth graders on a white board at West Gate K-8 School:

“Bye Kids, Mrs. Tirado loves you and wishes you the best in life! I have been fired for refusing to give you a 50% for not handing anything in.  Mrs. Tirado.”

She told WPTV that she assigned an explorer notebook project and gave students two weeks to turn it in. Several students failed to do so.

In Tirado’s mind, no work should mean no credit. But then she checked the West Gate student and parent handbook. Below the chart detailing the score requirements for letter grades, there was a line in red ink.

“NO ZEROS- LOWEST POSSIBLE GRADE IS 50%.”

Tirado said she asked administrators what the score should be if a student doesn’t turn anything in.

“We give them a 50,” she was told.

“I go, ‘Oh, we don’t.’ This isn’t kosher,” Tirado said.

What happened next might also qualify as not being kosher. Tirado was fired on Sept. 14.

The principal sent her a letter, but it did not mention the reason for her termination because Tirado was still in her probationary period.

The principal referred media to the district public information office, which is where things get confusing.

Kerry Padrick, the chief information officer, released this statement. It read in part:

“There is no District or individual school policy prohibiting teachers from recording a grade of zero for work not turned in. The District’s Uniform Grading System utilizes letter grades A-F, numerical grades 100-0 and grade point averages from 4-0.”

When asked about West Gate’s “no zero” policy in the handbook, Padrick said, “Some classroom teachers and school faculties have discussed the range of points for work submitted in each grading category.”

So Tirado apparently didn’t violate district rules, but she must have violated something. She said she was told to abide by the handbook and never give a student a zero.

Tirado posted her goodbye message on a class app. It hit home with a few students.

“You were right about not giving people 50s because why would you give them half credit for doing nothing?” one student wrote.

She later posted it on her Facebook and it has been shared more than 500 times.

Tirado just hopes the students learned a lesson, even if it wasn’t about U.S. history.

“I’m so upset because we have a nation of kids that are expecting to get paid and live their life just for showing up,” she said to WPTV, “and it’s not real.”

SOURCEhttps://www.foxnews.com/us/florida-teacher-claims-she-lost-job-after-refusing-to-give-half-credit-to-students-who-didnt-turn-in-work

QUESTIONS FOR “50% FAIL” ARTICLE

1.  What is the main point of this article? Give evidence from the article to support your response.

2.  What’s to major conflict being written about in the article? Use quotes from the article to support your response.

3.  Write a maximum  two-sentence summary of this article.

4.  What is the teacher’s claim?

5.  What is the school district’s counterclaim?

6.  Is anyone trying to persuade anyone else of something in this article? Explain.

7.  Explain the meaning of this sentence from the article: 

“I’m so upset because we have a nation of kids that are expecting to get paid and live their life just for showing up,” she said to WPTV, “and it’s not real.”

8.  Do you agree with the claim made in this sentence? Explain.

9.  Do you think it’s fair to students who do pass in their work if those who do not are given a 50% grade?  Explain.

CP 14

10 jobs for artists and people who love drawing: Picture your future in these art careers. Jon Simmons, Monster contributor

Jobs for artists are as varied as the color wheel itself. If you love to draw, your passion could very well sketch out an impressive career path. And you’d be in good company: Some of the most notorious doodlers in history happened to be our presidents. In contrast to long-held popular beliefs, doodling actually improves concentration and can spark creativity, according to recent research.

So sharpen those pencils (or computer skills) and get ready to draw. Using data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics and PayScale, Monster found 10 arts jobs for the doodler in you.

Animator

What you’d do: Animators develop characters, objects, and environments for various applications, including video game development, motion graphics for TV and film, and more.
What you’d need: A bachelor’s degree in computer graphics or multimedia studies is usually required, as well as 2-D and 3-D animation and design skills.
What you’d make: $49,803 per year

Art teacher

What you’d do: Encourage future doodlers! Remember art class, where you could finally let your imagination loose? If you’re an art teacher, you get to create that opportunity for kids every day.
What you’d need: Public school teachers need a state certification on top of a bachelor’s degree.
What you’d make: $55,490 per year

Cake decorator

What you’d do: Cake decorators whip up everything from elaborate multi-tiered wedding cakes to more straightforward creations for corporate events, birthdays, and other celebrations.
What you’d need: Cake decorators usually hone their skills in culinary school.
What you’d make: $25,090 per year

Fashion designer

What you’d do: There’s lots of clothing—outerwear, underwear, streetwear, everywhere!—and all of it needs to be designed. Same goes for shoes and accessories. Fashion designers create wearables with performance, comfort, and style in mind.
What you’d need: A bachelor’s degree in fashion design or merchandising is usually required, and you should be up on the latest fashion trends, have an acute sense of detail, and knowledge of apparel construction standards and materials.
What you’d make: $61,444 per year

Graphic designer

What you’d do: Graphic designers create and edit visuals, typically in graphic design software like Adobe InDesign. You’d most likely work directly for a brand or for a variety of clients at an agency.
What you’d need: A bachelor’s degree in graphic design or a related field such as printmaking is the typical minimum, although a portfolio of your work will likely also be required.
What you’d make: $47,640 per year

Illustrator and technical illustrator

What you’d do: Illustrators get their doodle on every day, creating everything from sketches and storyboards to glyphs and logos. Technical illustrators (also known as scientific illustrators) use descriptions of products to create visual counterparts. They draft charts, schematics, and diagrams that will often appear in technical publications, textbooks, or user manuals.
What you’d need: A bachelor’s or associate’s degree in illustration will help you land this job.
What you’d make: $56,305 per year

Industrial designer

What you’d do: From cars to home appliances to manufactured goods, industrial designers are the people behind the designs. Your job is to weigh a bunch of factors like function, aesthetics, and production cost, and propose designs to project managers.
What you’d need: Along with a portfolio of your best work, industrial designers should have a related bachelor’s degree in fields like graphic design or engineering.
What you’d make: $67,790 per year

Makeup artist

What you’d do: Interested in art and cosmetics? This job’s all about making people look great, whether it’s on the set of a movie or at a brand. Let’s call it face doodling.
What you’d need: Typically, you’ll need a certificate from a cosmetology program.
What you’d make: $24,300 per year

Motion graphics designer

What you’d do: Do you like big, explodey stuff and slick 3-D models? Not to be confused with animators, motion graphics designers create and edit imagery in a live action shot, which might also contain animation and special effects.
What you’d need: Most hiring managers look for a bachelor’s degree in computer graphics or film, plus a qualified portfolio of motion graphics work. Besides that, you’ll want to sharpen your software skills with commonly used programs in the Adobe creative suite such as After Effects.
What you’d make: $56,580 per year

Painter

What you’d do: Painters come in many shades, including interior and exterior painters, and in industrial and automotive capacities.
What you’d need: Painting doesn’t require a college degree, so many people pursue it after high school and get on-the-job training.
What you’d make: $37,570 per year

https://www.monster.com/career-advice/article/arts-jobs-for-drawing-0517

CP 15

BULLFIGHTING

Bullfighting is Not a Sport – It is a Tragedy

It symbolizes the struggle between man and beasts. The three acts of the drama are the entry, the planting of the banderilleros, and the death of the bull. A Canadian at ringside.

It was spring in Paris and everything looked just a little too beautiful. Mike and I decided to go to Spain. Strater drew us a fine map of Spain on the back of a menu of the Strix restaurant. On the same menu he wrote the name of a restaurant in Madrid where the specialty is young suckling pig roasted, the name of the pensione on the Via San Jerónimo where the bullfighters live, and sketched a plan showing where the Grecos are hung in the Prado.

Fully equipped with this menu and our old clothes, we started for Spain. Our objective—to see bullfights.

We left Paris one morning and got off the train at Madrid the next noon. We saw our first bullfight at 4:30 that afternoon. It took about two hours to get tickets. We finally got them from scalpers for twenty-five pesetas apiece. The bullring was entirely sold out. We had barrera seats. These, the scalper explained in Spanish and broken French, were the first row of the ringside, directly under the royal box, and immediately opposite where the bulls would come out.

Ernest Hemingway saw his first bullfight in 1923 in Pamplona, Spain, and wrote about it for the Star Weekly. It quickly became one of the passions of his life, and the inspiration for his first novel, The Sun Also Rises. Here Hemingway is photographed, in white pants and dark sweater, confronting a charging bull. THE HEMINGWAY COLLECTION/JOHN F. KENNEDY PRESIDENTIAL LIBRARY AND MUSEUM

We asked him if he didn’t have any less distinguished seats for somewhere around twelve pesetas, but he was sold out. So we paid the fifty pesetas for the two tickets, and with the tickets in our pockets sat out on the sidewalk in front of a big café near the Puerta del Sol. It was very exciting, sitting out in front of a café your first day in Spain with a ticket in your pocket that meant that rain or shine you were going to see a bullfight in an hour and a half. In fact, it was so exciting that we started out for the bullring on the outskirts of the city in about half an hour.

The bullring or Plaza de Toros was a big, tawny brick amphitheater standing at the end of a street in an open field. The yellow and red Spanish flag was floating over it. Carriages were driving up and people getting out of buses. There was a great crowd of beggars around the entrance. Men were selling water out of big terra-cotta water bottles. Kids sold fans, canes, roasted salted almonds in paper spills, fruit and slabs of ice cream. The crowd was gay and cheerful but all intent on pushing toward the entrance. Mounted civil guards with patent-leather cocked hats and carbines slung over their back sat their horses like statues, and the crowd flowed through.

Inside they all stood around in the bullring, talking and looking up in the grandstand at the girls in the boxes. Some of the men had field glasses in order to look better. We found our seats and the crowd began to leave the ring and get into the rows of concrete seats. The ring was circular—that sounds foolish, but a boxing ring is square—with a sand floor. Around it was a red board fence—just high enough for a man to be able to vault over it. Between the board fence, which is called the barrera, and the first row of seats ran a narrow alleyway. Then came the seats which were just like a football stadium except that around the top ran a double circle of boxes.

Every seat in the amphitheater was full. The arena was cleared. Then on the far side of the arena out of the crowd, four heralds in medieval costume stood up and blew a blast on their trumpets. The band crashed out, and from the entrance on the far side of the ring four horsemen in black velvet with ruffs around their necks rode out into the white glare of the arena. The people on the sunny side were baking in the heat and fanning themselves. The whole sol. side was a flicker of fans.

Behind the four horsemen came the procession of the bullfighters. They had been all formed in ranks in the entranceway ready to march out, and as the music started they came. In the front rank walked the three espadas, or toreros, who would have charge of the killing of the six bulls of the afternoon.

They came walking out in heavily brocaded yellow and black costumes, the familiar “toreador” suit, heavy with gold embroidery, cape, jacket, shirt and collar, knee breeches, pink stockings, and low pumps. Always at bullfights, afterward the incongruity of those pink stockings used to strike me. Just behind the three principals—and after your first bullfight you do not look at their costumes but their faces—marched the teams, or cuadrillas. They are dressed in the same way but not as gorgeously as the matadors.

Back of the teams ride the picadors. Big, heavy, brown-faced men in wide flat hats, carrying lances like long window poles. They are astride horses that make Spark Plug look as trim and sleek as a King’s Plate winner. Back of the pics come the gaily harnessed mule teams and the red-shirted monos, or bullring servants.

The bullfighters march in across the sand to the president’s box. They march with easy professional stride, swinging along, not in the least theatrical except for their clothes. They all have the easy grace and slight slouch of the professional athlete. From their faces they might be major league ball players. They salute the president’s box and then spread out along the barrera, exchanging their heavy brocaded capes for the fighting capes that have been laid along the red fence by the attendants.

We leaned forward over the barrera. Just below us the three matadors of the afternoon were leaning against the fence talking. One lighted a cigarette. He was a short, clear-skinned gypsy, Gitanillo, in a wonderful gold brocaded jacket, his short pigtail sticking out under his black cocked hat.

“He’s not very fancy,” a young man in a straw hat, with obviously American shoes, who sat on my left, said.

“But he sure knows bulls, that boy. He’s a great killer.”

“You’re an American, aren’t you?” asked Mike.

“Sure,” the boy grinned. “But I know this gang. That’s Gitanillo. You want to watch him. The kid with the chubby face is Chicuelo. They say he doesn’t really like bullfighting, but the town’s crazy about him. The one next to him is Villalta. He’s the great one.”

I had noticed Villalta. He was straight as a lance and walked like a young wolf. He was talking and smiling at a friend who leaned over the barrera. Upon his tanned cheekbone was a big patch of gauze held on with adhesive tape.

“He got gored last week at Málaga,” said the American.

The American, whom later we were to learn to know and love as the Gin Bottle King, because of a great feat of arms performed at an early hour of the morning with a container of Mr. Gordon’s celebrated product as his sole weapon in one of the four most dangerous situations I have ever seen, said: “The show’s going to begin.”

Out in the arena the picadors had galloped their decrepit horses around the ring, sitting straight and stiff in their rocking-chair saddles. Now all but three had ridden out of the ring. These three were huddled against the red painted fence of the barrera. Their horses backed against the fence, one eye bandaged, their lances at rest.

In rode two of the marshals in the velvet jackets and white ruffs. They galloped up to the president’s box, swerved and saluted, doffing their hats and bowing low. From the box an object came hurtling down. One of the marshals caught it in his plumed hat.

“The key to the bullpen,” said the Gin Bottle King.

The two horsemen whirled and rode across the arena. One of them tossed the key to a man in torero costume, they both saluted with a wave of their plumed hats, and had gone from the ring. The big gate was shut and bolted. There was no more entrance. The ring was complete.

The crowd had been shouting and yelling. Now it was dead silent. The man with the key stepped toward an iron-barred, low, red door and unlocked the great sliding bar. He lifted it and stepped back. The door swung open. The man hid behind it. Inside it was dark.

Then, ducking his head as he came up out of the dark pen, a bull came into the arena. He came out all in a rush, big, black and white, weighing over a ton, and moving with a soft gallop. Just as he came out the sun seemed to dazzle him for an instant. He stood as though he were frozen, his great crest of muscle up, firmly planted, his eyes looking around, his horns pointed forward, black and white and sharp as porcupine quills. Then he charged. And as he charged, I suddenly saw what bullfighting is all about.

Hemingway poses in a corrida in Spain circa 1923. THE HEMINGWAY COLLECTION/JOHN F. KENNEDY PRESIDENTIAL LIBRARY AND MUSEUM

For the bull was absolutely unbelievable. He seemed like some great prehistoric animal, absolutely deadly and absolutely vicious. And he was silent. He charged silently and with a soft, galloping rush. When he turned he turned on his four feet like a cat. When he charged the first thing that caught his eye was the picador on one of the wretched horses. The picador dug his spurs into the horse and they galloped away. The bull came on in his rush, refused to be shaken off, and in full gallop crashed into the animal from the side, ignored the horse, drove one of his horns high into the thigh of the picador, and tore him, saddle and all, off the horse’s back.

The bull went on without pausing to worry the picador lying on the ground. The next picador was sitting on his horse braced to receive the shock of the charge, his lance ready. The bull hit him sideways on, and horse and rider went high up in the air in a kicking mass and fell across the bull’s back. As they came down the bull charged into them. The dough-faced kid, Chicuelo, vaulted over the fence, ran toward the bull and flapped his cape into the bull’s face. The bull charged the cape and Chicuelo dodged backward and had the bull clear in the arena.

Without an instant’s hesitation, the bull charged Chicuelo. The kid stood his ground, simply swung back on his heels and floated his cape like a ballet dancer’s skirt into the bull’s face as he passed.

“Olé!”—pronounced Oh-Lay!—roared the crowd.

The bull whirled and charged again. Without moving, Chicuelo repeated the performance. His legs rigid, just withdrawing his body from the rush of the bull’s horns and floating the cape out with that beautiful swing.

Again the crowd roared. The Kid did this seven times. Each time the bull missed him by inches. Each time he gave the bull a free shot at him. Each time the crowd roared. Then he flopped the cape once at the bull at the finish of a pass, swung it around behind him and walked away from the bull to the barrera.

“He’s the boy with the cape all right,” said the Gin Bottle King. “That swing he did with the cape’s called a veronica.”

The chubby-faced Kid who did not like bullfighting and had just done the seven wonderful veronicas was standing against the fence just below us. His face glistened with sweat in the sun but was almost expressionless. His eyes were looking out across the arena where the bull was standing making up his mind to charge a picador. He was studying the bull because a few minutes later it would be his duty to kill him, and once he went out with his thin, red-hilted sword and his piece of red cloth to kill the bull in the final set it would be him or the bull. There are no drawn battles in bullfighting.

I am not going to describe the rest of that afternoon in detail. It was the first bullfight I ever saw, but it was not the best. The best was in the little town of Pamplona high up in the hills of Navarre, and came weeks later. Up in Pamplona, where they have held six days of bullfighting each year since A.D. 1126, and where the bulls race through the streets of the town each morning at six o’clock with half the town running ahead of them. Pamplona, where every man and boy in town is an amateur bullfighter and where there is an amateur fight each morning that is attended by 20,000 people in which the amateur fighters are all unarmed and there is a casualty list at least equal to a Dublin election. But Pamplona, with the best bullfight and the wild tale of the amateur fights, comes in the second chapter.

I am not going to apologize for bullfighting. It is a survival of the days of the Roman Colosseum. But it does need some explanation. Bullfighting is not a sport. It was never supposed to be. It is a tragedy. A very great tragedy. The tragedy is the death of the bull. It is played in three definite acts.

The Gin Bottle King—who, by the way, does not drink gin—told us a lot of this that first night as we sat in the upstairs room of the little restaurant that made a specialty of roast young suckling pig, roasted on an oak plank and served with a mushroom tortilla and vino rojo. The rest we learned later at the bullfighters’ pensione in the Via San Jerónimo, where one of the bullfighters had eyes exactly like a rattlesnake.

Much of it we learned in the sixteen fights we saw in different parts of Spain from San Sebastian to Granada.

At any rate bullfighting is not a sport. It is a tragedy, and it symbolizes the struggle between man and the beasts. There are usually six bulls to a fight. A fight is called a corrida de toros. Fighting bulls are bred like race-horses, some of the oldest breeding establishments being several hundred years old. A good bull is worth about $2,000. They are bred for speed, strength and viciousness. In other words a good fighting bull is an absolutely incorrigible bad bull.

Bullfighting is an exceedingly dangerous occupation. In the sixteen fights I saw there were only two in which there was no one badly hurt. On the other hand it is very remunerative. A popular espada gets $5,000 for his afternoon’s work. An unpopular espada though may not get $500. Both run the same risks. It is a good deal like Grand Opera for the really great matadors except they run the chance of being killed every time they cannot hit high C.

No one at any time in the fight can approach the bull except directly from the front. That is where the danger comes. There are also all sorts of complicated passes that must be done with the cape, each requiring as much technique as a champion billiard player. And underneath it all is the necessity for playing the old tragedy in the absolutely custom-bound, law-laid-down way. It must all be done gracefully, seemingly effortlessly and always with dignity. The worst criticism the Spaniards ever make of a bullfighter is that his work is “vulgar.”

The three absolute acts of the tragedy are first the entry of the bull when the picadors receive the shock of his attacks and attempt to protect their horses with their lances. Then the horses go out and the second act is the planting of the banderillos. This is one of the most interesting and difficult parts but among the easiest for a new bullfight fan to appreciate in technique. The banderillos are three-foot, gaily colored darts with a small fishhook prong in the end. The man who is going to plant them walks out into the arena alone with the bull. He lifts the banderillos at arm’s length and points them toward the bull. Then he calls “Toro! Toro!” The bull charges and the banderillero rises to his toes, bends in a curve forward and, just as the bull is about to hit him, drops the darts into the bull’s hump just back of his horns.

They must go in evenly, one on each side. They must not be shoved, or thrown or stuck in from the side. This is the first time the bull has been completely baffled, there is the prick of the darts that he cannot escape and there are no horses for him to charge into. But he charges the man again and again and each time he gets a pair of the long banderillos that hang from his hump by their tiny barbs and flop like porcupine quills.

Last is the death of the bull, which is in the hands of the matador who has had charge of the bull since his first attack. Each matador has two bulls in the afternoon. The death of the bull is most formal and can only be brought about in one way, directly from the front by the matador, who must receive the bull in full charge and kill him with a sword thrust between the shoulders just back of the neck and between the horns. Before killing the bull he must first do a series of passes with the muleta, a piece of red cloth about the size of a large napkin. With the muleta, the torero must show his complete mastery of the bull, must make the bull miss him again and again by inches, before he is allowed to kill him. It is in this phase that most of the fatal accidents occur.

The word “toreador” is obsolete Spanish and is never used. The torero is usually called an espada, or swordsman. He must be proficient in all three acts of the fight. In the first he uses the cape and does veronicas and protects the picadors by taking the bull out and away from them when they are spilled to the ground. In the second act he plants the banderillos. In the third act he masters the bull with the muleta and kills him.

Few toreros excel in all three departments. Some, like young Chicuelo, are unapproachable in their capework. Others like the late Joselito are wonderful banderilleros. Only a few are great killers. Most of the greatest killers are gypsies.

The Toronto Star Weekly, Oct. 20, 1923.

SOURCE:  http://ehto.thestar.com/marks/bullfighting-is-not-a-sport-it-is-a-tragedy

RESPONSES TO Bullfighting is Not a Sport – It is a Tragedy, written by  Ernest Hemingway. Answer the following questions about the article and about Hemingway’s life.

RESPONSES

  1. What is the Main Point of the article Bullfighting is Not a Sport – It’s a Tragedy?
  2. Briefly summarize this article.
  3. Is Hemingway writing in favor of or against bullfighting?  Explain.
  4. Do you think bullfighting should be banned?  Explain.
  5. Would you call Bullfighting a sport?  Why?  Why not? Explain.
  6. When and where was Ernest Hemingway born?
  7. What are three famous works written by Hemingway? Give a one-line description of each.
  • Why is it important to the spectators that the bull be killed in such a specific way?
  1. Is bullfighting in any way similar to rodeo?  Explain.


CP 16

Mayday! One Man’s Story of Surviving a Plane Crash  

Michael Trapp was doing just fine, thank you very much, as he guided his 1966 Cessna 150 out over the waters of Lake Huron. It was midafternoon on July 26, 2011. He was cruising along at an easy 3,000 feet, on his way to a family reunion in Eau Claire, Wisconsin, from his home in Gouverneur, New York, in the northern part of the state.

His wife, Julie, had voiced her disapproval — even asked him to make out a will if he insisted on going — but he had brushed her off. True, it was his longest trip to date, and yes, the plane was older than he was, and sure, he had never before had to cross “big water,” and OK, he had only 130 hours of flying under his belt — but, really, what could go wrong? He had made hundreds of takeoffs and landings, had mapped out his route carefully, and had even left a day ahead of schedule to avoid bad weather. He was saving hundreds of dollars by not flying commercial. There was a word for people who shelled out nearly a thousand bucks for the privilege of getting groped by security agents and being packed in like sardines: suckers.

And then the engine noise changed. Distinctly. Was he running out of gas? Shouldn’t be. He flicked the selector switch to change fuel tanks. The engine continued to lose power, and his altitude was slipping. He turned on his carburetor heater. No change. He opened up the throttle. The plane continued to descend. He peered forward through the windshield; he could see land up ahead, the shoreline that, on a map, looks like the thumb of Michigan’s mitten. He radioed Lansing and gave his position and heading.

“I’m over the water, and my engine is having trouble,” he said. “Could you just keep an eye on me, please? Just make sure I get to shore?”

Trapp was told to switch to an emergency radio frequency so rescuers would have his location and identification. The water was coming up fast, 100 feet. He switched back over to Lansing. “I’m going into the drink,” he shouted. He had slowed to 49 miles per hour, knowing that at 48, his plane would no longer stay in the air. His stall horn began blaring. He opened his door and tickled the yoke to ease the nose up. Just to taunt him, the engine suddenly roared back to life. Too late.

The tail hit first. The plane somersaulted, the windshield blew in, and lake water exploded into the cockpit. Lansing’s reply to Trapp’s Mayday was drowned out in the furious rush of water. It was 4:12 in the afternoon.

At 42, Trapp was not what you’d call physically fit. The auto mechanic and self-described motor-head weighed himself regularly — every time he competed in the local stock-car racing circuit. His five-foot-nine, 204- pound frame reflected his laid-back approach to life. He didn’t worry about much; he liked to laugh and to make others laugh; he surrounded himself with friends and family.

On paper, he may have looked like a thrill seeker, but the real attraction of racing was the camaraderie. He enjoyed working on cars with his buddies as much as he liked racing them. He hadn’t always dreamed of flying. By chance, just three years earlier, he had ended up aloft in a friend’s plane, and the friend had said, “Take the yoke for a minute, Mike. I want to take some pictures.” Trapp was instantly hooked.

Months later, he had his license and had financed most of the $13,900 he paid for the Cessna. His sons and stepson — Jeffrey, 19, Nicholas, 17, and Drake, 11 — were thrilled and fought over who would get to fly with him out over the Adirondacks and the St. Lawrence River, looking down on the lakes and forests and small towns of upstate New York. But Julie was less than enthusiastic. The plane scared her. She flew with him a grand total of two times. If he wanted to risk his life, that was one thing, but he could leave her out of it.

Now Trapp held his breath and unbuckled his safety harness. He swam underwater and out the open door and surfaced clinging to the tail. The plane was still sinking. He let go and watched the Cessna drifting down below his sneakers — 30, 40, 50 feet, until it disappeared. “Bye, girl,” he said. It had taken less than a minute to sink. Well, you’re alive, he thought. And the water’s not too cold, though it was in the mid-60s to low-70s.

Without the plane to hold on to, and with no flotation device, he would have to tread water. The problem was the waves — over six feet high — which kept plunging him underwater. He’d come up sputtering, flailing, and kicking and would just get his breath when the next one would pummel him. You’ve got to come up with a plan, he said to himself. In the Navy, he was trained to turn a pair of pants into a life jacket. He kicked off his sneakers, peeled off his jeans, tied the pant legs, filled them with air, and wrapped the rig around his neck. When the next big wave came, the pants twisted around his throat, nearly strangling him. Well, that was stupid, he thought.

Furious, he threw the pants away and went back to treading water. He rolled over onto his back to catch his breath, but the waves were relentless. Water rushed down his throat, into his lungs. He threw up into the lake. You just survived a plane crash, he said to himself. And now you’re going to drown. His jeans were still floating a few feet away, so he paddled over to them, pulled out his wallet, and tucked it into his underwear. So that they could identify the body.

Julie got the call a little after 6 p.m. The details were slim: Michael had made a Mayday call. He was missing. The Coast Guard would be searching. They would be in touch. She hung up, dazed and even angry. “Told you so,” she whispered. There was nothing to do but wait. The Coast Guard dispatched three aircraft and three boats, but the authorities hadn’t gotten a good fix on Trapp’s position before the crash, so the search area was spread over 1,840 square miles — roughly the size of Grand Canyon National Park. And in six-foot waves, a human head sticking out of the water is a tiny thing indeed.

Well, I’m not ready to die just yet, Trapp was thinking. The waves were rough, yes, but he remembered seeing something on TV about a 12- year-old girl who had swum the English Channel. If a 12-year-old girl can do that, I can hang out here and float for a while, he thought. It was hard, though, not to fixate on all the things he’d left in the plane — his waterproof cell phone, for one, and two packs of Little Debbie’s Swiss Rolls, but also a cooler and a water jug, either of which would have helped him stay afloat.

He rolled over into a dog paddle and something caught his eye. A channel marker buoy? He began swimming toward it, elated. Well, hell, he thought, I’ll just swim to that and hang on to it until they come get me, and I’ll be good. He swam hard for two hours, occasionally rolling onto his back to rest. Once while he was resting, with his ears underwater, he heard a motor coming. He popped his head out of the water and scanned the horizon. There, not 50 yards away, floated a huge freighter. He waved and screamed, but the ship slogged past, nearly drowning him in its massive wake.

The sun was setting in front of him when he realized that the channel marker he’d been swimming toward was not a channel marker at all: It was the top of a factory smokestack on shore.

All right, he thought. Even better. I’ll swim to shore. He was within two miles of the twinkling lights of the shoreline when he encountered a stiff current that utterly stymied him. He would swim for all he was worth, until he could barely breathe and his muscles were burned-out and useless, then roll over onto his back to rest. By the time he’d recover, he’d have actually lost ground.

The first star came out. He made a wish. Back in Gouverneur, distraught family and friends crowded into the house. Naturally reserved, Julie said little, just waited by the phone. She appreciated the show of support but wanted more than anything to be left alone. At last, the place cleared out, and she lay down, but her mind raced with possibilities she would rather not consider. When she finally drifted off to sleep, it was on Michael’s side of the bed.

Throughout the night, two helicopters, a C-130 airplane from North Carolina, a local sheriff’s department plane, and a Canadian Air Force plane scoured the search area. Trapp never saw them. What he did see was the green light of a channel buoy down the shore a ways. Back to plan A, then — cling to a buoy until rescued. But still the current thwarted him. For hours he kept it up, maddened by how tantalizingly close the buoy was, swimming until his limbs all went to jelly, then resting on his back in the starlight, only to find himself further away than when he’d started. Nobody’s coming tonight, he realized. You need to just relax and wait for the sun to come up. And then in the morning somebody will see you and come get you.

He lay back and floated, mesmerized by the stars, watching the satellites scrape across the sky, amazed at the number of meteors you could spot when you had nothing else to look at. The waves had subsided, and he swam only to keep within the warm spots in the water. When he caught himself shivering, he willed himself to stop, rubbing at his goose bumps until he could float calmly again. He thought of his loved ones. So many people depended on him: Julie, their sons, his employees at the garage, his friends. He found he could take mini-vacations from his ordeal by visualizing himself at home with the people he cared about — laughing with his buddies, curled in bed beside Julie. Then a frigid wave would land in his face, and he would cough out the water and start over again. He was on one of his mini-vacations when something bumped hard into his side. What the — ?

He felt around for a log or debris. It was neither. It was a fish. An awfully big fish. His mind began racing, picturing the massive jaws hurtling up from the depths to make a meal of him. Whoa! You got to get that out of your mind. No time for that now. He lay back and relaxed again. And a mosquito began drilling into his forehead. Are you kidding me? Two miles from shore? Have you no mercy? He swore and slapped around in the air, and the mosquito flew off. Later in the night, he had rolled into his dog paddle position to get his bearings when a shadow fluttered between him and the lights of shore. He peered hard through the gloom and saw what it was — a seabird, a cormorant. It circled him several times, then lighted on the black water and began swimming toward him. Holy crap. This thing’s gonna peck my eyes out. “Get outta here!” he hollered, and the startled bird did just that.

As he waited for the sun to come up, he thought about his whole life. The stupid things he’d done. The pointless arguments with Julie. He began to pray. Let me hug my wife just one more time. Let me hug my kids just one more time. Please. Let something good come. More boats passed, but Trapp bobbed there as invisible and insignificant as a chunk of wood. When the sun rose, its warmth was welcome, but it brought with it choppier waves. He was very cold now, and his depleted muscles were cramping severely. You don’t have a lot of choices, he said to himself. You either swim or die. Those are the only choices you get.

He decided to try to swim at an angle through the current and reach shore that way. He was paddling hard when a fishing boat came by, close, close, so close, it felt like he could touch it. Three guys were walking around on deck. He screamed and waved for all he was worth, until there was nothing left inside him and he had no choice but to roll over onto his back and recuperate. By the time he was rested, the current had dragged him 500 yards from the boat. “Gosh darn it,” he cursed.

He could no longer feel his hands, and there was a strange tingling in his arms. You’ve got to relax, he told himself again. But it was getting harder to do. He looked up and saw a sailboat approaching. He pulled a credit card out of his wallet and began reflecting the sun’s rays at the boat. He alternated between that and waving one of his socks. No luck. Over the next couple of hours, two more sailboats came by, and he tried in vain to hail them. He could feel himself reaching his physical limit. He’d been in the water for nearly 18 hours now.

Another boat approached, between him and the open water. Cramped and crippled, Trapp paddled toward the vessel in an awkward sidestroke, then stopped and began waving the sock and flashing the credit card. The boat kept going. Please, please, please. Come on. I may not get another chance at this. Please!

Dean and Diane Petitpren and their guests were three hours into their vacation aboard their 58-foot Viking pleasure boat when Diane glanced toward shore and saw something floating in the water. She kept her eye on the spot as their hired captain, Erik Krueger, brought the vessel around.

It was 10:30 when Julie Trapp’s phone rang. “Hello?” she said cautiously. “Is your husband’s name Michael?” Marita Grobbel, the Petitprens’ boat guest, was asking as they sped toward the nearest harbor. Julie couldn’t bring herself to answer. “We’ve found him, in Lake Huron.” “Marita! Tell her he’s alive!” Dean Petitpren shouted.

Mike Trapp was taken to Covenant Healthcare hospital in Saginaw, Michigan, and treated for exhaustion and hypothermia. That evening, he was lying in his hospital bed marveling at his good fortune when he looked up to see Julie standing in the doorway. “I don’t want to hurt you, so I won’t hug you too tight,” she said. “Don’t worry about that,” Trapp said, his eyes brimming with tears. So she hugged him as hard as she wanted to.

According to the U.S. Search and Rescue Task Force, a person in 60-to-70-degree water can expect to reach exhaustion or unconsciousness in two to seven hours. Trapp’s ordeal lasted 18.

He lost seven pounds and spent three days in the hospital recuperating from dangerously high levels of a protein — released by his overworked muscles — that can overwhelm the kidneys.

Then he went home, to a hero’s welcome.

Back on the boat, after his rescuers had dragged him out of the water, Trapp was wrapped in a thick, black blanket and given a banana. It was bliss. “This was like the best banana you’ve ever had in your life,” he says. “And I could feel the sun radiating on the blanket and warming my body. I was … there were …” he collects his thoughts. “There are very few moments in your life that are as precious as that. I enjoy my life. I have fun. I’m just not ready to give it all up yet.” “I’m a survivor”

SOURCE:  https://www.iat.gov/Training/Attachments/Uploads/Mayday%20Pre_Work%20Reading.pdf

  1. What is the main point of this story?
  • Briefly summarize this story?
  • Is Michael Trapp (the pilot) a hero?  Explain.
  • What questions would you like to ask Trapp about his ordeal?
  • How would you have coped and survived in a similar situation?
  • Do you think Trapp showed good or poor discretion by setting out on the trip in the first place? Explain.
  • Is the writer drawing on any of Aristotle’s “appeals” in his telling of the story? If so, which one(s)? Explain.
CP 17

VOCAB TEST 1 PRACTICE (WORK IN PAIRS)

ON A SEPARATE SHEET OF PAPER, MATCH THE BEGINNINGS (numbers) AND ENDINGS (letters) OF THE FOLLOWING VOCAB WORDS AND WRITE THE DEFINITION OF EACH COMPLETED WORD

BEGINNING    END

1. Des-                  A. iguous

2. Spo-                  B. idize

3. Zea-                   C. ulous

4. Dis-                   D. ane

5. Rud-                  E. lot

6. Detr-                 F. argy

7. Sen-                  G. radic

8. Scrup-               H. iment

9. Leth-                 I. ilient

10. Squ-                J. bellish

11. Sc-                   K. ter

12. Greg-              L. sory

13. Ven-                M. gate

14. Subs-              N. terous

15. Juxt-                O. etious

16. Ret-                 P. aborate

17. Res-                 Q. ident

18. Amb-              R. apose

19. Inad-               S. cretion

20. Diss-                T. arious

21. In-                    U. imum

22. Frit-                 V. pondent

23. Osten-           W. arious

24. Dex-                X. erate

25. Vic-                  Y. rospect

26. Fac-                 Z. elch

27. Insti-               AA. off

28. Opt-                BB. tatious

29. Em-                 CC. vertent

30. Coll-                DD. imentary

SAMPLE ANSWER FORMAT

Number/Letter            Vocab Word                  Definition

1, V                                  Despondent                  Depressed, without hope

2, G                                  Sporadic                         Occasional … etc.

CP 18

The Secret Life of Walter Mitty | The New Yorker

https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/1939/03/18/the-secret-life-of-walter-james-thurber 1/6

“We’re going through!” The Commander’s voice was like thin ice breaking. He wore his full-dress uniform, with the heavily braided white cap pulled down rakishly over one cold gray eye. “We can’t make it, sir. It’s spoiling for a hurricane, if you ask me.” “I’m not asking you, Lieutenant Berg,” said the Commander. “Throw on the power lights! Rev her up to 8,500! We’re going through!” The pounding of the cylinders increased: ta-pocketa-pocketa-pocketa-pocketa-pocketa. The Commander stared at the ice forming on the pilot window. He walked over and twisted a row of complicated dials. “Switch on No. 8 auxiliary!” he shouted. “Switch on No. 8 auxiliary!” repeated Lieutenant Berg. “Full strength in No. 3 turret!” shouted the Commander.

“Full strength in No. 3 turret!” The crew, bending to their various tasks in the huge, hurtling eight-engined Navy hydroplane, looked at each other and grinned. “The Old Man’ll get us through,” they said to one another. “The Old Man ain’t afraid of Hell!” . . .

“Not so fast! You’re driving too fast!” said Mrs. Mitty. “What are you driving so fast for?”

“Hmm?” said Walter Mitty. He looked at his wife, in the seat beside him, with shocked astonishment. She seemed grossly unfamiliar, like a strange woman who had yelled at him in a crowd. “You were up to fifty-five,” she said. “You know I don’t like to go more than forty. You were up to fifty-five.” Walter Mitty drove on toward Waterbury in silence, the roaring of the SN202 through the worst storm in twenty years of Navy flying fading in the remote, intimate airways of his mind. “You’re tensed up again,” said Mrs. Mitty. “It’s one of your days. I wish you’d let Dr. Renshaw look you over.” Walter Mitty stopped the car in front of the building where his wife went to have her hair done. “Remember to get those overshoes while I’m having my hair done,” she said.

“I don’t need overshoes,” said Mitty. She put her mirror back into her bag.

“We’ve been all through that,” she said, getting out of the car. “You’re not a young man any longer.”

He raced the engine a little. “Why don’t you wear your gloves? Have you lost your gloves?” Walter Mitty reached in a pocket and brought out the gloves. He put them on, but after she had turned and gone into the building and he had driven on to a red light, he took them off again. “Pick it up, brother!” snapped a cop as the light changed, and Mitty hastily pulled on his gloves and lurched ahead. He drove around the streets aimlessly for a time, and then he drove past the hospital on his way to the parking lot.

. . . “It’s the millionaire banker, Wellington McMillan,” said the pretty nurse. “Yes?” said Walter Mitty, removing his gloves slowly. “Who has the case?” “Dr. Renshaw and Dr. Benbow, but there are two specialists here, Dr. Remington from New York and Dr. Pritchard-Mitford from London. He flew over.” A door opened down a long, cool corridor and Dr. Renshaw came out. He looked distraught and haggard. “Hello, Mitty,” he said. “We’re having the devil’s own time with McMillan, the millionaire banker and close personal friend of Roosevelt. Obstreosis of the ductal tract. Wish you’d take a look at him.” “Glad to,” said Mitty.

In the operating room there were whispered introductions: “Dr. Remington, Dr. Mitty. Dr. Pritchard-Mitford, Dr. Mitty.” “I’ve read your book on streptothricosis,” said Pritchard-Mitford, shaking hands. “A brilliant performance, sir.” “Thank you,” said Walter Mitty. “Didn’t know you were in the States, Mitty,” grumbled Remington.

“Coals to Newcastle, bringing Mitford and me up here for a tertiary.” “You are very kind,” said Mitty.

A huge, complicated machine, connected to the operating table, with many tubes and wires, began at this moment to go pocketa-pocketa-pocketa. “The new anaesthetizer is giving way!” shouted an interne. There is no one in the East who knows how to fix it!” “Quiet, man!” said Mitty, in a low, cool voice. He sprang to the machine, which was now going pocketa-pocketa-queep-pocketa-queep. He began fingering delicately a row of glistening dials. “Give me a fountain pen!” he snapped. Someone handed him a fountain pen. He pulled a faulty piston out of the machine and inserted the pen in its place. “That will hold for ten minutes,” he said. “Get on with the operation.” A nurse hurried over and whispered to Renshaw, and Mitty saw the man turn pale. “Coreopsis has set in,” said Renshaw nervously. “If you would take over, Mitty?” Mitty looked at him and at the craven figure of Benbow, who drank, and at thegrave, uncertain faces of the two great specialists. “If you wish,” he said. They slipped a white gown on him; he adjusted a mask and drew on thin gloves; nurses handed him shining . . .

“Back it up, Mac! Look out for that Buick!” Walter Mitty jammed on the brakes. “Wrong lane, Mac,” said the parking-lot attendant, looking at Mitty closely. “Gee. Yeh,” muttered Mitty. He began cautiously to back out of the lane marked “Exit Only.” “Leave her sit there,” said the attendant. “I’ll put her away.” Mitty got out of the car. “Hey, better leave the key.” “Oh,” said Mitty, handing the man the ignition key. The attendant vaulted into the car, backed it up with insolent skill, and put it where it belonged. They’re so damn cocky, thought Walter Mitty, walking along Main Street; they think they know everything. Once he had tried to take his chains off, outside New Milford, and he had got them wound around the axles. A man had had to come out in a wrecking car and unwind them, a young, grinning garageman. Since then Mrs. Mitty always made him drive to a garage to have the chains taken off. The next time, he thought, I’ll wear my right arm in a sling; they won’t grin at me then. I’ll have my right arm in a sling and they’ll see I couldn’t possibly take the chains off myself.

He kicked at the slush on the sidewalk. “Overshoes,” he said to himself, and he began looking for a shoe store. When he came out into the street again, with the overshoes in a box under his arm, Walter Mitty began to wonder what the other thing was his wife had told him to get. She had told him, twice, before they set out from their house for Waterbury. In a way he hated these weekly trips to town—he was always getting something wrong. Kleenex, he thought, Squibb’s, razor blades? No. Toothpaste, toothbrush, bicarbonate, carborundum, initiative and referendum? He gave it up. But she would remember it.

“Where’s the what’s-its-name?” she would ask. “Don’t tell me you forgot the what’s-itsname.”

A newsboy went by shouting something about the Waterbury trial.

. . . “Perhaps this will refresh your memory.” The District Attorney suddenly thrust a heavy automatic at the quiet figure on the witness stand. “Have you ever seen this before?” Walter Mitty took the gun and examined it expertly. “This is my Webley-Vickers 50.80,” he said calmly. An excited buzz ran around the courtroom. The Judge rapped for order. “You are a crack shot with any sort of firearms, I believe?” said the District Attorney, insinuatingly. “Objection!” shouted Mitty’s attorney. “We have shown that the defendant could not have fired the shot. We have shown that he wore his right arm in a sling on the night of the fourteenth of July.” Walter Mitty raised his hand briefly and the bickering attorneys were stilled. “With any known make of gun,” he said evenly, “I could have killed Gregory Fitzhurst at three hundred feet with my left hand.” Pandemonium broke loose in the courtroom. A woman’s scream rose above the bedlam and suddenly a lovely, dark-haired girl was in Walter Mitty’s arms. The District Attorney struck at her savagely. Without rising from his chair, Mitty let the man have it on the point of the chin. “You miserable cur!” . . .

“Puppy biscuit,” said Walter Mitty. He stopped walking and the buildings of Waterbury rose up out of the misty courtroom and surrounded him again. A woman who was passing laughed. “He said ‘Puppy biscuit,’ ” she said to her companion. “That man said ‘Puppy biscuit’ to himself.” Walter Mitty hurried on. He went into an A. & P., not the first one he came to but a smaller one farther up the street. “I want some biscuit for small, young dogs,” he said to the clerk. “Any special brand, sir?” The greatest pistol shot in the world thought a moment. “It says ‘Puppies Bark for It’ on the box,” said Walter Mitty.

His wife would be through at the hairdresser’s in fifteen minutes, Mitty saw in looking at his watch, unless they had trouble drying it; sometimes they had trouble drying it. She didn’t like to get to the hotel first; she would want him to be there waiting for her as usual. He found a big leather chair in the lobby, facing a window, and he put the overshoes and the puppy biscuit on the floor beside it. He picked up an old copy of Liberty and sank down into the chair. “Can Germany Conquer the World Through the Air?” Walter Mitty looked at the pictures of bombing planes and of ruined streets.

. . . “The cannonading has got the wind up in young Raleigh, sir,” said the sergeant. Captain Mitty looked up at him through touselled hair. “Get him to bed,” he said wearily. “With the others. I’ll fly alone.” “But you can’t, sir,” said the sergeant anxiously. “It takes two men to handle that bomber and the Archies are pounding hell out of the air. Von Richtman’s circus is between here and Saulier.” “Somebody’s got to get that ammunition dump,” said Mitty. “I’m going over. Spot of brandy?” He poured a drink for the sergeant and one for himself. War thundered and whined around the dugout and battered at the door. There was a rending of wood and splinters flew through the room. “A bit of a near thing,” said Captain Mitty carelessly. “The box barrage is closing in,” said the sergeant. “We only live once, Sergeant,” said Mitty, with his faint, fleeting smile. “Or do we?” He poured another brandy and tossed it off. “I never see a man could hold his brandy like you, sir,” said the sergeant. “Begging your pardon, sir.”  Captain Mitty stood up and strapped on his huge Webley-Vickers automatic. “It’s forty kilometres through hell, sir,” said the sergeant. Mitty fnished one last brandy. “After all,” he said softly, “what isn’t?” The pounding of the cannon increased; there was the rat-tat-tatting of machine guns, and from somewhere came the menacing pocketapocketa-pocketa of the new flame-throwers. Walter Mitty walked to the door of the dugout humming “Auprès de Ma Blonde.” He turned and waved to the sergeant.

“Cheerio!” he said. . . .

Something struck his shoulder. “I’ve been looking all over this hotel for you,” said Mrs. Mitty. “Why do you have to hide in this old chair? How did you expect me to find you?” “Things close in,” said Walter Mitty vaguely. “What?” Mrs. Mitty said. “Did you get the what’s-its-name? The puppy biscuit? What’s in that box?” “Overshoes,” said Mitty. “Couldn’t you have put them on in the store?” “I was thinking,” said Walter Mitty. “Does it ever occur to you that I am sometimes thinking?” She looked at him.

“I’m going to take your temperature when I get you home,” she said. 

They went out through the revolving doors that made a faintly derisive whistling sound when you pushed them. It was two blocks to the parking lot. At the drugstore on the corner she said, “Wait here for me. I forgot something. I won’t be a minute.” She was more than a minute. Walter Mitty lighted a cigarette. It began to rain, rain with sleet in it. He stood up against the wall of the drugstore, smoking. . .. He put his shoulders back and his heels together. “To hell with the handkerchief,” said Walter Mitty scornfully. He took one last drag on his cigarette and snapped it away. Then, with that faint, fleeting smile playing about his lips, he faced the firing squad; erect and motionless, proud and disdainful, Walter Mitty the Undefeated, inscrutable to the last.

LISTEN, READ AND RESPOND TO Walter Mitty

RESPOND TO THE FOLLOWING QUESTIONS WITH A PARTNER (Joint Grade):

                   i.   What are the main points of this story?

                   ii.  Briefly summarize this story.

iii.  CHARACTER:  Write a character analysis of Walter Mitty. (What kind of person is he? Why does he behave in the way he does? What kind of life has he built around himself? Is he a brave person? Explain. What or who are the major influences in his life? Could you be his friend? Explain. etc)

iv.  What, if anything, do the characters that Mitty imagines himself to be have in common? Explain.

v.  WRITING PROCESS:  What are some technical and other challenges that James Thurber had to overcome in writing this short story? How did he overcome them?

vi.  Did you like this short story and would you recommend it to others? Explain.

4

VOCABULARY TESTS

STUDY GUIDES

NAME ___________________      PERIOD ________

ENGLISH 12 VOCABULARY TEST 1 (Parts A, B and C)

A: Briefly define the following words:

1. Detriment ______________________________

______________________________

2. Dexterous

______________________________

______________________________

3. Discretion

______________________________

______________________________

4. Facetious

______________________________

______________________________

5. Gregarious

______________________________

______________________________

6. Optimum

______________________________

______________________________

7. Ostentatious

______________________________

______________________________

8. Scrupulous

______________________________

______________________________

9. Sensory

______________________________

______________________________

10. Vicarious

______________________________

______________________________

11. Collaborate

______________________________

______________________________

12. Despondent

______________________________

______________________________

13. Instigate

______________________________

______________________________

14. Resilient

______________________________

______________________________

15. Retrospect

______________________________

______________________________

B. CHOOSE THE DEFINITION THAT BEST APPLIES TO THE FOLLOWING WORDS

1. Rudimentary

a) Silly

b) Intermediate

c) Advanced

d) Basic

2. Scoff

a) To laugh at

b) To watch

c) To take seriously

d) To choke

3. Squelch

a) To encourage

b) To swim

c) To watch

d) To hold back

4. Venerate

a) To pity

b) To mock

c) To honor

d) To remember

5. Zealot

a) An extremist

b) An observer

c) A doubter

d) A cook

6. Ambiguous

a) Unpleasant

b) Unintentional

c) Unclear

d) Unworthy

7.  Dissident

a) A dishonest person

b) A rebel

c) A song

d) A foolish person

8. Embellish

a) Damage

b) Hide

c) Decorate

d) Grow

9. Fritter

a) Earn

b) Waste

c) Count

d) Breakfast

10. Inadvertent

a) Not required

b) Not finished

c) Not intended

d) Not cold

SECTION C

ON NEXT PAGE

11. Inane

a) Shocking

b) Silly

c) Interesting

d) Dishonest

12. Juxtapose

a) To put side by side

b) To cover up

c) To paint

d) To replace

13. Lethargy

a) Weariness

b) Hopelessness

c) Foolishness

d) Disinterest

14.  Sporadic

a) Long

b) Steady

c) Irregular

d) Happy

15. Subsidize

a) To advertise

b) To pay for

c) To criticize

d) To steal

C. Use any FIVE of the words above properly in a complete sentence.

WORD 1: ______________

SENTENCE ______________________________________________

_______________________________________________________

WORD 2: ______________

SENTENCE ______________________________________________

_______________________________________________________

WORD 3: ______________

SENTENCE ______________________________________________

_______________________________________________________

WORD 4: ______________

SENTENCE ______________________________________________

_______________________________________________________

WORD 5: ______________

SENTENCE ________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________

NAME __________________                 PERIOD ______

ENGLISH 12 VOCABULARY TEST 2 (Parts A and B)

A: Briefly define the following words:

1. Berate

_________________________

_________________________

2. Estrange

_________________________

_________________________

3. Euphoric

_________________________

_________________________

4. Impetuous

_________________________

_________________________

5. Infallible

_________________________

_________________________

6. Maudlin

_________________________

_________________________

7. Regress

_________________________

_________________________

8. Relinquish

_________________________

_________________________

9. Ubiquitous

_________________________

_________________________

10. Zenith

_________________________

_________________________

11. Charlatan

_________________________

_________________________

12. Corroborate

_________________________

_________________________

13. Diverge

_________________________

_________________________

14. Disseminate

_________________________

_________________________

15. Dormant

_________________________

_________________________

16. Hoist

_________________________

_________________________

17. Illicit

_________________________

_________________________

18. Irrevocable

_________________________

_________________________

19. Precipitate

_________________________

_________________________

20. Proliferation

_________________________

_________________________

SECTION B

ON NEXT PAGE

B. Use any FIVE of the words above properly in a complete sentence.

WORD 1: ______________ SENTENCE __________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________________

WORD 2: ______________ SENTENCE __________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________________

WORD 3: ______________ SENTENCE __________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________________

WORD 4: ______________ SENTENCE __________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________________

WORD 5: ______________ SENTENCE __________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________________

NAME ___________________________                     PERIOD _______

ENGLISH 12 VOCABULARY TEST 3 (Parts A and B)

PART A: Briefly define the following words and word parts:

1. ante-

______________________

_______________________

2. chrono-

_______________________

_______________________

3. extra-

_______________________

_______________________

4. Liber-

_______________________

_______________________

5. -cide

_______________________

_______________________

6. voc-

_______________________

_______________________

7. equivocate

_______________________

_______________________

8. fortuitous

_______________________

_______________________

9. reprehensible

_______________________

_______________________

10. de-

_______________________

_______________________

11. liaison

_______________________

_______________________

12. propensity

_______________________

_______________________

13. sham

_______________________

_______________________

14. solace

_______________________

_______________________

15. solicitous

_______________________

_______________________

16. impeccable

_______________________

_______________________

17. cohesive

_______________________

_______________________

18. robust

_______________________

_______________________

19. attrition

_______________________

_______________________

20. circumvent

_______________________

_______________________

21. inundate

_______________________

PART B. Use any FIVE of the words above properly in a complete sentence.   WORD 1: ______________   SENTENCE ________________________________________________________________________________   _________________________________________________________________________________   WORD 2: ______________   SENTENCE ________________________________________________________________________________   _________________________________________________________________________________   WORD 3: ______________   SENTENCE ________________________________________________________________________________   _________________________________________________________________________________   WORD 4: ______________   SENTENCE ________________________________________________________________________________   _________________________________________________________________________________   WORD 5: ______________   SENTENCE ________________________________________________________________________________   _________________________________________________________________________________  

_______________________

22. oblivious

_______________________

_______________________

23. reticent

_______________________

_______________________

24. vociferous

_______________________

_______________________

25. grievous

_______________________

_______________________

NAME(S) ___________________             PERIOD ________

ENGLISH 12 VOCABULARY TEST 4

CHOOSE THE WORD THAT BEST DEFINES THE VOCAB WORDS BELOW

  1. detriment 1

a. grovel

b. happy

c. disadvantage

d. birthday

  • dexterous 1

a. sugar

b. skillful

c. playful

d. poor

  • discretion 1

a. good sense

b. read well

c. emptiness

d. culture

  • facetious 1

a. funny

b. knotty

c. unexpected

d. scary

  • gregarious 1

a. before

b. sullen

c. outgoing

d. round

  • optimum 1

a. choice

b. overhead

c. below

d. ideal

  • ostentatious 1

a. unapproved

b. showy

c. approved

d. stuck

  • scrupulous 1

a. high

b. low

c. ethical

d. private

  • sensory 1

a. of the senses

b. decision

c. multiple

d. many

  1. vicarious 1

a. sticky

b. family

c. angry

d. indirect

  1. collaborate 2

a. mind

b. oppose

c. act as a team

d. fold

  1. despondent 2

a. well dressed

b. arguing

c. depressed

d. cheerful

  1. instigate 2

a. cause

b. deliver

c. stand

d. resist

  1. resilient 2

a. quick to recover

b. hot

c. steady

d. sneaky

  1. retrospect 2

a. indistinct

b. unequalled

c. changed

d. looking back

  1. rudimentary  2

a. basic

b. complicated

c. unwell

d. positive

  1. scoff 2

a. applaud

b. withhold

c. to laugh at

d. undo

  1. squelch 2

a. break

b. play

c. to hold back

d. believe

  1. venerate 2

a. without help

b. honor

c. mature

d. transfer

  • zealot 2

a. good friend

b. an extremist

c. a fish

d. run quickly

  • ambiguous 3

a. write

b. full up

c. unclear

d. opposite

  • dissident 3

a. different

b. unhappy

c. solid

d. rebel

  • embellish 2

a. decorate

b. open

c. stuff

d. overeat

  • fritter 2

a. study

b. beautiful

c. old

d. waste

  • Inadvertent 3

a. unintended

b. debatable

c. honest

d. airborne

  • inane 3

a. smart

b. normal

c. weak

d. silly

  • juxtapose 3

a. funny

b. photograph

c. put side-by-side

d. understand

  • lethargy 3

a. boost

b. hungry

c. weariness

d. certainty

  • sporadic 3

a. irregular

b. colorful

c. dry

d. rich

  • subsidize 3

a. standard

b. to pay for

c. broken

d. fruity

  • berate 4

a. working

b. cover

c. to scold angrily

d. pretend

  • estrange 4

a. odd

b. funny

c. weird

d. to drive away

  • euphoric 4

a. trying hard

b. very happy

c. seasonal

d. crazy

  • impetuous 4

a. impulsive

b. young

c. prepared

d. motorized

  • infallible 4

a. sensible

b. unexpected

c. perfect

d. dirty

  • maudlin 4

a. named

b. lightest

c. heaviest

d. overly emotional

  • regress 4

a. jump high

b. to go backwards

c. spend too much

d. deliver

  • relinquish 4

a. refurbish

b. rekindle

c. to give up

d. the throw off

  • ubiquitous 4

a. gentle

b. everywhere

c. nowhere

d. hard

  • zenith 4

a. timely

b. bright

c. lowest point

d. highest point

  • charlatan 5

a. muckraker

b. a con artist

c. dancer

d. chef

  • corroborate 5

a. motionless

b. invest

c. work together

d. support

  • diverge 5

a. to separate

b. to tell

c. to lie

d. to explain

  • disseminate 5

a. to hope

b. to spread

c. to know

d. to argue

  • dormant 5

a. not active

b. next to

c. blocking

d. foolish

  • hoist 5

a. scam

b. jolt

c. to trick

d. to raise

  • illicit 6

a. wet

b. dry

c. illegal

d. moist

  • irrevocable 5

a. unhappy

b. not reversible

c. boastful

d. without equal

  • precipitate 5

a. arrange

b. collect

c. to bring on

d. put off

  • proliferation 5

a. rapid increase

b. spinning

c. noisy

d. ignored

  • ante- 6

a. full of ants

b. against

c. before

d. working

  • chrono- 6

a. firearm

b. photograph

c. old lady

d. time

  • extra-  6

a.

b. outside

c.

d.

  • liber- 6

a. before

b. after

c. during

d. free

  • -cide 6

a. kill

b. bury

c. grow

d. replace

  • voc- 6

a. a wheel

b. car

c. voice

d. house

  • equivocate 7

a. same as

b. different to

c. to be unclear

d. to tell a lie

  • fortuitous 7

a. broad

b. narrow

c. intended

d. accidental

  • reprehensible 7

a. redo

b. proud

c. shameful

d. meritorious

  • de- 6

a. revisit

b. removal

c. repay

d. relive

  • liaison 7

a. link

b. lazy

c. lying around

d. without reason

  • propensity 7

a. size

b. an inclination

c. prosperity

d. outside

  • sham 7

a. a meat dish

b. a cloth

c. something false

d. type of building

  • solace 7

a. sunny

b. forgotten

c. relief

d. complicated

  • solicitous 7

a. legal

b. calling out

c. attentive

d. silent

  • impeccable 7

a. too far away

b. sticky

c. flawless

d. productive

  • cohesive 8

a. connected

b. battered

c. shady

d. slow

  • robust 8

a. strong and well

b. lost

c. against

d. for

  • attrition 8

a. addition to

b. other tan

c. loss of

d. more than

  • circumvent 8

a. a window

b. to avoid

c. bad air

d. atmosphere

  • inundate 8

a. murder

b. fire

c. flood

d. plague

  • oblivious 8

a. clear

b. uncomplicated

c. hidden

d. not noticing

  • reticent 8

a. require

b. residue

c. happy

d. quiet

  • vociferous 8

a. full up

b. loud

c. bursting

d. simmering

  • grievous 8

a. terrible

b. mourning

c. like a grave

d. mountainous

TAKE-HOME MIDTERM EXAM

DUE MONDAY MARCH 25, 2019

ENGLISH 12 TAKE-HOME MIDTERM EXAM

DUE MONDAY MARCH 25, 2019

PART I

  1. Who is Walter Mitty?

________________________________________________________________

  • What is Walter Mitty’s most notable personality trait?

 ________________________________________________________________

  • Who or what is Beowulf?

________________________________________________________________

  • What kind of English is Beowulf written in?

________________________________________________________________

  • Who wrote Beowulf?

________________________________________________________________

  • What significant lie(s) does Beowulf tell, and how does that affect his opinion of himself?

________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________

  • Is Beowulf a hero? Explain.

________________________________________________________________

  • What is the “main idea” of a text/artistic work?

________________________________________________________________

  • Define “persuasion.”

________________________________________________________________

  1. What are the three main persuasive appeals, according to Aristotle? Briefly define each one.

________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________

  1. What is a “logical fallacy”?

________________________________________________________________

  1. Name and give an example of a logical fallacy.

________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________

  1. What two elements must a sentence have to be complete?

________________________________________________________________

  1. Define the term “point of view”.

________________________________________________________________

  1. What is the difference between building and argument and simply having an argument?

 ________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________

(MORE)

  1. Briefly define the following 10 words:

Dexterous

________________________________________________________________

Gregarious

________________________________________________________________

Ambiguous

________________________________________________________________

Venerate

________________________________________________________________

Lethargy

________________________________________________________________

Inadvertent

________________________________________________________________

Resilient

________________________________________________________________

Optimum

________________________________________________________________

Collaborate

________________________________________________________________

Sporadic

________________________________________________________________

PART II ON NEXT PAGE

MIDTERM PART II

CHOOSE THE CORRECT WORD IN EACH OF THESE SENTENCES

1.  Is this (your / you’re) book?

2.  My dog is cuter then / than your dog.

3.  Every dog has its/it’s day.

4.  Please (accept / except) my apologies.

5. (Their / There / They’re) house is bigger (then / than) yours

6. We (would of / would have) won if we tried harder.  

7.  We’re going (to / too) the park! 

8. The principal’s/principle’s absence won’t (affect / effect) graduation celebrations.  

9. This is (our / are) time to shine. 

10.  The quarter back (passed / past) the ball to his wide receiver.  

11.  (Whose / who’s) fault is that?!  

12.  (Your / You’re) really going to do that? 

13. First eat your dinner (then / than) you can have desert.  

14.  (Its / It’s) a beautiful day!  

15.  Everyone (accept / except) Mary showed up to the meeting.   

16.  (Their / There / They’re) are many reasons why she won the race. 

17.  (Their / There / They’re) the kindest people I’ve ever met. 

18. There are just (to / too) many cooks in this kitchen. 

19. Honest people live according to ethical (principals / principles.) 

20. (Our / Are) we there yet?! 

21. It’s well (passed / past) his bedtime. 

22. You’re the one (whose / who’s) going to benefit.

23. Please take (your / you’re) time.

24.  (We’re / where) are you?

25.   (Whose / who’s going to clean that mess up?

ENGLISH 12 SPRING 2019 CLASS SYLLABUS AND SEMESTER RULES GUIDE

ENGLISH 12 CLASS RULES AND SYLLABUS (Spring 2019)

Teacher: Mr. Kozaczek (Mr. K)

Email:  leslie.kozaczek@kayenta.k12.az.us

Front Office Phone: (928) 697-2175

Course Description

This standards-based course blends composition and Literature into a cohesive whole as students write critical and comparative analyses of selected literature, continuing to develop their language arts skills. Students will critically analyze what they read and synthesize knowledge acquired throughout their academic careers. Students are encouraged to read independently and formulate a life-long appreciation of multiple types of literature. Students will primarily write  short assignments and a multi-paragraph essay, but potentially could be asked to write a research or other longer paper.

Course Objectives

  • In this class we want to learn to write well, so a major concentration will be learning to utilize direct grammar, conventions and expanded vocabulary. There will be a lot of smallish writing projects and a few larger writing projects.
  • We will learn to view various works of film and literature analytically.
  • Most importantly, we will practice being critical thinkers, readers and writers, so an open mind is required of all students.

Text Books

Prentice Hall Literature: The British Tradition.

Others as necessary.

Major Texts

The Canterbury Tales, by Geoffrey Chaucer (Excerpted)

Macbeth, by William Shakespeare (For Utah Shakespeare Festival Company Performance)

Suggested Supplies

  • College ruled lined paper/notebook
  • 3-ring binder
  • Pencils and pens
  • An open heart and an open  mind

Assessments

ESSAYS – There will be at least one essay assigned, which will require the following:

  • Outline/Pre-Writing: 15 points
  • Rough Draft: 25 points
  • Second Draft w/peer Edit: 20 points
  • Final Draft: 40 points.

Group Projects/Presentations

There will be at least one group project this semester; these projects will be researched based, and the final product will be assessed in the form of an oral/visual presentation.

Quizzes and Exams

students will be administered the following forms of tests

  • Vocabulary
  • Text Comprehension
  • Grammar Tests
  • A Midterm Test
  • A Final Project
  • Numerous in-class readings and exercises
  • Daily Bell work – Questions of the Day

Grading Policy

Grades will be based on a student’s performance on completion of writings, group discussion/response, in-class/home reading and other assignments, and tests/exams.

This class requires completion of many smaller assignments, which are graded effectively on a Pass/Fail basis, with 10/10 points being a pass, and 0/10 points being a fail. However, work that is incomplete or otherwise deficient will receive less than 10/10 points, but more than 0/10 points. E.g. A response that addresses only 3 of 4 questions might receive a 7/10 points. Work that substantially exceeds the assignment requirements will receive extra credit up to 12/10 points.

UNMODIFIED GRADING SCALE

A         100 – 90%

B         89 – 80%

C         79 – 70%

D         69 – 60%

F          59 – 0%

Note: A student must earn at least a 60% pass the class.

MODIFIED GRADING SCALE

A         80-100     

B         79-70       

C         69-60       

D         59-50       

F          49 & below with no effort

Attendance/Credit

Students who have 10 or more UNEXCUSED absences during the course of a semester will automatically earn an F grade and receive no credit for the class. English 12 is a requirement for graduation, so a loss of credit will result in a student having to take the course again.

Group/Pairs Work

Students will be encouraged to complete several tasks as a pair or in a group. This will mean that a single grade will be awarded to the pair/group for work passed in as a pair/group.  

For example: Students A and B in a pair complete the reading and responses from a textbook assignment. They produce a single response paper, WITH BOTH THEIR NAMES ON IT, WRITTEN SIDE-BY-SIDE, that they hand in for grading. The single response receives an A grade. Both students receive that A grade.

Absent Work

It is the student’s responsibility to obtain and make up any missed work due to absence. (Excused or unexcused.)

Excused Absences – The student is expected to make up work missed due to absence as soon as possible.

Late Work

Any late work not submitted on the date, at the time it is due is subject to a penalty of one letter grade each day it is late, however, a more flexible policy could be employed if necessary.

Expected Classroom Behavior and Classroom Philosophy

Students are expected to behave in a respectful and responsible manner. No student will be permitted to act in a way that persistently disrespects another person or in any way interferes with another student’s right to learn.  Both school and classroom rules will be strongly enforced.  Any student who does not abide by these rules is demonstrating that he/she has chosen to incur a consequence – Please refer to the MVHS/KUSD parent/student handbook for a description of those consequences.

12 the Grade Freedom

This is 12th Grade. Next stop: outta here! Many students are already adults or close to it. Until now, many students have become accustomed to being treated like children at school, relying on others to monitor their behavior and to chase them down for missed work etc.

This class tries to take a step away from that model, which will be gone after graduation. This means that, at least initially, students are given the “adult” space they need to make the most mature decisions they can make regarding their own conduct and academic performance.

For example, use of personal electronic equipment in class, hall passes, rescheduling (with the teacher) of deadlines for completed work etc are all based on some broad guidelines, rather than on strict restrictions.

Some students handle this freedom better than others, and, sometimes, the rules will need to get stricter for the entire class, if and when students fail to properly monitor themselves or each other.

Three Strike Warning System

Students who persist in causing problems in class will receive a first warning, which means that the undesired activity must stop immediately.  (Not “In a minute, when I finish this text.” Etc)

Students who do not immediately stop the undesired behavior will quickly receive a second warning. Again, the undesired behavior must stop immediately.

Students who fail to respond appropriately to warnings 1 and 2 will be written up and sent to the office for further disciplinary action.

The teacher will notify the office if students refuse to leave the classroom, or cause prolonged disruption while leaving the classroom, so that the student can be escorted out of the classroom.

PLEASE NOTE: This class will be fairly relaxed, so there will be a temptation to become too relaxed, and to forget the high importance and demand that the teacher holds and expects for mutual respect among all class members. For example, holding a side conversation, despite being asked not to, when someone is addressing the class will very likely result in disciplinary action, even if the atmosphere of the class seems very relaxed at the time. Or the repeated refusal to remove headwear or put personal electronics away will result in disciplinary action, even if the class atmosphere seems very relaxed at the time. Bottom line: Only the student can monitor his or her own behavior, and he or she will be expected to do so.

Plagiarism, Cheating and Other Academic Infractions

Students who present plagiarized work, who talk during tests, who write their names on other student’s works or who in any way violate the MVHS rules regarding academic performance will receive an immediate 50 Point deduction from their course grade. This would bring a 75% C grade down to a 25% failing Grade. Students who cheat will not be allowed extra time to complete other work, nor will they be allowed to retake the test or whatever task it was that they were caught cheating on.

A second instance of cheating will result in failure for the course.

Teacher Error

While the teacher will do his best to make sure that all grades are recorded accurately and in a timely fashion, the sheer number of students, grades and assignments the teacher must deal with in a very short window of time means that, inevitably, the teacher will make data entry and possibly other errors.

Please be assured that the teacher is not lying awake at nights thinking of ways to destroy his students’ lives by entering bad data because he hates them. Any such mistake will be simple human error, and the teacher will happily and immediately correct any such mistake(s) as he is alerted to them. He will even add an extra point to the assignment as incentive for students to find and address such errors.

To help this correction process go smoothly, please hold on to all graded work for reference in the case of a possible data entry mistake and need for grade adjustment.

PARTIAL CHECKLIST FOR MAJOR GRADED ASSIGNMENTS AND TESTS FOR

ENGLISH 12, SPRING 2019

TEXTBOOK ASSIGNMENTS AND RESPONSES                              o     

LONG-TERM PROJECT/FINAL EXAM                                               o

MIDTERM EXAM                                                                                 o

IN-CLASS READING RESPONSES (HANDOUTS)                            o

IN-CLASS MEDIA RESPONSES                                                        o

PERSUASION ESSAY                                                                                 o

VOCAB TEST 1                                                                                  o

VOCAB TEST 2                                                                                  o

VOCAB TEST 3                                                                                  o

VOCAB TEST 4                                                                                  o

CHAUCER/CANTERBURY TALES                                                     o

(CLASS PRESENTATION?)                                                                        o

SIGNATURE PAGE

I UNDERSTAND AND AGREE TO THE INFORMATION AND INSTRUCTION AND PENALTIES ABOVE, KNOWN AS THE ENGLISH 12 SPRING 2019 WORKBOOK, AND I AGREE TO ABIDE BY THE RESPONSIBILITIES AND REQUIREMENTS THEREIN

I UNDERSTAND THAT THE INFORMATION ABOVE IS SUBJECT TO CHANGE AT ANY TIME AND FOR ANY REASON BY THE COURSE TEACHER OR BY AN APPROPRIATE ADMINISTRATOR.

SIGNATURE: __________________________________        DATE: ______________

PRINT NAME: ________________________________          CLASS PERIOD: ______

ADDED TEXTS AND EXERCISES

ENGLISH 12                                          TUESDAY JANUARY 15, 2019

* QotD

* FINISH SEAFARER EXERCISE

* In-Class Vocab Exercise – 15 Points

1.  Each student pair/group will be randomly assigned a role from the list below.

2.  Each group will write a script or a story relevant to that role.

3.  Each written script or story MUST include any FIVE of the 15 vocab words below.

4.  The use of the word must be accurate.

5.  Using different forms of the word is acceptable. For example: A student who chooses the word “regress”, can use alternate forms of the word, such as regressed, regressing, regresses . The point is that the word be used properly.

6.  The finished script or story will be presented to the class.

7.  This is a graded (by group) exercise, in which 2 points are given for each proper word use, and 5 more points are given for overall quality of the finished product.

8.  An extra credit of up to 2 points will be given for correct use of a 6th vocab word.

9.  Each vocab word used MUST be underlined, highlighted or clearly identified in some way.

IMAGINARY ROLES

  1. TV or Radio NBA Commentator
  2. TV News Reader
  3. Student Grade Report Card
  4. Story, Romantic
  5. Story, Action Adventure
  6. Story, Horror
  7. A Witness to a Crime Giving Testimony in Court
  8. Graduation Speech
  9. Father of the Bride Giving a Wedding Speech
  10. An explanation of Why You Were Late to School for the Fifth Day in a Row

PROPERLY USE ANY 5 OF THESE WORDS IN YOUR RESPONSE

Detriment; Dexterous; Discretion; Facetious; Gregarious; Maudlin; Regress; Relinquish; Ubiquitous; Zenith; Hoist; Illicit; Irrevocable; Precipitate; Proliferation

The Secret Life of Walter Mitty | The New Yorker

https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/1939/03/18/the-secret-life-of-walter-james-thurber 1/6

“We’re going through!” The Commander’s voice was like thin ice breaking. He wore his full-dress uniform, with the heavily braided white cap pulled down rakishly over one cold gray eye. “We can’t make it, sir. It’s spoiling for a hurricane, if you ask me.” “I’m not asking you, Lieutenant Berg,” said the Commander. “Throw on the power lights! Rev her up to 8,500! We’re going through!” The pounding of the cylinders increased: ta-pocketa-pocketa-pocketa-pocketa-pocketa. The Commander stared at the ice forming on the pilot window. He walked over and twisted a row of complicated dials. “Switch on No. 8 auxiliary!” he shouted. “Switch on No. 8 auxiliary!” repeated Lieutenant Berg. “Full strength in No. 3 turret!” shouted the Commander.

“Full strength in No. 3 turret!” The crew, bending to their various tasks in the huge, hurtling eight-engined Navy hydroplane, looked at each other and grinned. “The Old Man’ll get us through,” they said to one another. “The Old Man ain’t afraid of Hell!” . . .

“Not so fast! You’re driving too fast!” said Mrs. Mitty. “What are you driving so fast for?”

“Hmm?” said Walter Mitty. He looked at his wife, in the seat beside him, with shocked astonishment. She seemed grossly unfamiliar, like a strange woman who had yelled at him in a crowd. “You were up to fifty-five,” she said. “You know I don’t like to go more than forty. You were up to fifty-five.” Walter Mitty drove on toward Waterbury in silence, the roaring of the SN202 through the worst storm in twenty years of Navy flying fading in the remote, intimate airways of his mind. “You’re tensed up again,” said Mrs. Mitty. “It’s one of your days. I wish you’d let Dr. Renshaw look you over.” Walter Mitty stopped the car in front of the building where his wife went to have her hair done. “Remember to get those overshoes while I’m having my hair done,” she said.

“I don’t need overshoes,” said Mitty. She put her mirror back into her bag.

“We’ve been all through that,” she said, getting out of the car. “You’re not a young man any longer.”

He raced the engine a little. “Why don’t you wear your gloves? Have you lost your gloves?” Walter Mitty reached in a pocket and brought out the gloves. He put them on, but after she had turned and gone into the building and he had driven on to a red light, he took them off again. “Pick it up, brother!” snapped a cop as the light changed, and Mitty hastily pulled on his gloves and lurched ahead. He drove around the streets aimlessly for a time, and then he drove past the hospital on his way to the parking lot.

. . . “It’s the millionaire banker, Wellington McMillan,” said the pretty nurse. “Yes?” said Walter Mitty, removing his gloves slowly. “Who has the case?” “Dr. Renshaw and Dr. Benbow, but there are two specialists here, Dr. Remington from New York and Dr. Pritchard-Mitford from London. He flew over.” A door opened down a long, cool corridor and Dr. Renshaw came out. He looked distraught and haggard. “Hello, Mitty,” he said. “We’re having the devil’s own time with McMillan, the millionaire banker and close personal friend of Roosevelt. Obstreosis of the ductal tract. Wish you’d take a look at him.” “Glad to,” said Mitty.

In the operating room there were whispered introductions: “Dr. Remington, Dr. Mitty. Dr. Pritchard-Mitford, Dr. Mitty.” “I’ve read your book on streptothricosis,” said Pritchard-Mitford, shaking hands. “A brilliant performance, sir.” “Thank you,” said Walter Mitty. “Didn’t know you were in the States, Mitty,” grumbled Remington.

“Coals to Newcastle, bringing Mitford and me up here for a tertiary.” “You are very kind,” said Mitty.

A huge, complicated machine, connected to the operating table, with many tubes and wires, began at this moment to go pocketa-pocketa-pocketa. “The new anaesthetizer is giving way!” shouted an interne. There is no one in the East who knows how to fix it!” “Quiet, man!” said Mitty, in a low, cool voice. He sprang to the machine, which was now going pocketa-pocketa-queep-pocketa-queep. He began fingering delicately a row of glistening dials. “Give me a fountain pen!” he snapped. Someone handed him a fountain pen. He pulled a faulty piston out of the machine and inserted the pen in its place. “That will hold for ten minutes,” he said. “Get on with the operation.” A nurse hurried over and whispered to Renshaw, and Mitty saw the man turn pale. “Coreopsis has set in,” said Renshaw nervously. “If you would take over, Mitty?” Mitty looked at him and at the craven figure of Benbow, who drank, and at thegrave, uncertain faces of the two great specialists. “If you wish,” he said. They slipped a white gown on him; he adjusted a mask and drew on thin gloves; nurses handed him shining . . .

“Back it up, Mac! Look out for that Buick!” Walter Mitty jammed on the brakes. “Wrong lane, Mac,” said the parking-lot attendant, looking at Mitty closely. “Gee. Yeh,” muttered Mitty. He began cautiously to back out of the lane marked “Exit Only.” “Leave her sit there,” said the attendant. “I’ll put her away.” Mitty got out of the car. “Hey, better leave the key.” “Oh,” said Mitty, handing the man the ignition key. The attendant vaulted into the car, backed it up with insolent skill, and put it where it belonged. They’re so damn cocky, thought Walter Mitty, walking along Main Street; they think they know everything. Once he had tried to take his chains off, outside New Milford, and he had got them wound around the axles. A man had had to come out in a wrecking car and unwind them, a young, grinning garageman. Since then Mrs. Mitty always made him drive to a garage to have the chains taken off. The next time, he thought, I’ll wear my right arm in a sling; they won’t grin at me then. I’ll have my right arm in a sling and they’ll see I couldn’t possibly take the chains off myself.

He kicked at the slush on the sidewalk. “Overshoes,” he said to himself, and he began looking for a shoe store. When he came out into the street again, with the overshoes in a box under his arm, Walter Mitty began to wonder what the other thing was his wife had told him to get. She had told him, twice, before they set out from their house for Waterbury. In a way he hated these weekly trips to town—he was always getting something wrong. Kleenex, he thought, Squibb’s, razor blades? No. Toothpaste, toothbrush, bicarbonate, carborundum, initiative and referendum? He gave it up. But she would remember it.

“Where’s the what’s-its-name?” she would ask. “Don’t tell me you forgot the what’s-itsname.”

A newsboy went by shouting something about the Waterbury trial.

. . . “Perhaps this will refresh your memory.” The District Attorney suddenly thrust a heavy automatic at the quiet figure on the witness stand. “Have you ever seen this before?” Walter Mitty took the gun and examined it expertly. “This is my Webley-Vickers 50.80,” he said calmly. An excited buzz ran around the courtroom. The Judge rapped for order. “You are a crack shot with any sort of firearms, I believe?” said the District Attorney, insinuatingly. “Objection!” shouted Mitty’s attorney. “We have shown that the defendant could not have fired the shot. We have shown that he wore his right arm in a sling on the night of the fourteenth of July.” Walter Mitty raised his hand brie􀈫y and the bickering attorneys were stilled. “With any known make of gun,” he said evenly, “I could have killed Gregory Fitzhurst at three hundred feet with my left hand.” Pandemonium broke loose in the courtroom. A woman’s scream rose above the bedlam and suddenly a lovely, dark-haired girl was in Walter Mitty’s arms. The District Attorney struck at her savagely. Without rising from his chair, Mitty let the man have it on the point of the chin. “You miserable cur!” . . .

“Puppy biscuit,” said Walter Mitty. He stopped walking and the buildings of Waterbury rose up out of the misty courtroom and surrounded him again. A woman who was passing laughed. “He said ‘Puppy biscuit,’ ” she said to her companion. “That man said ‘Puppy biscuit’ to himself.” Walter Mitty hurried on. He went into an A. & P., not the first one he came to but a smaller one farther up the street. “I want some biscuit for small, young dogs,” he said to the clerk. “Any special brand, sir?” The greatest pistol shot in the world thought a moment. “It says ‘Puppies Bark for It’ on the box,” said Walter Mitty.

His wife would be through at the hairdresser’s in fifteen minutes, Mitty saw in looking at his watch, unless they had trouble drying it; sometimes they had trouble drying it. She didn’t like to get to the hotel first; she would want him to be there waiting for her as usual. He found a big leather chair in the lobby, facing a window, and he put the overshoes and the puppy biscuit on the floor beside it. He picked up an old copy of Liberty and sank down into the chair. “Can Germany Conquer the World Through the Air?” Walter Mitty looked at the pictures of bombing planes and of ruined streets.

. . . “The cannonading has got the wind up in young Raleigh, sir,” said the sergeant. Captain Mitty looked up at him through touselled hair. “Get him to bed,” he said wearily. “With the others. I’ll fly alone.” “But you can’t, sir,” said the sergeant anxiously. “It takes two men to handle that bomber and the Archies are pounding hell out of the air. Von Richtman’s circus is between here and Saulier.” “Somebody’s got to get that ammunition dump,” said Mitty. “I’m going over. Spot of brandy?” He poured a drink for the sergeant and one for himself. War thundered and whined around the dugout and battered at the door. There was a rending of wood and splinters flew through the room. “A bit of a near thing,” said Captain Mitty carelessly. “The box barrage is closing in,” said the sergeant. “We only live once, Sergeant,” said Mitty, with his faint, fleeting smile. “Or do we?” He poured another brandy and tossed it off. “I never see a man could hold his brandy like you, sir,” said the sergeant. “Begging your pardon, sir.”  Captain Mitty stood up and strapped on his huge Webley-Vickers automatic. “It’s forty kilometres through hell, sir,” said the sergeant. Mitty fnished one last brandy. “After all,” he said softly, “what isn’t?” The pounding of the cannon increased; there was the rat-tat-tatting of machine guns, and from somewhere came the menacing pocketapocketa-pocketa of the new flame-throwers. Walter Mitty walked to the door of the dugout humming “Auprès de Ma Blonde.” He turned and waved to the sergeant.

“Cheerio!” he said. . . .

Something struck his shoulder. “I’ve been looking all over this hotel for you,” said Mrs. Mitty. “Why do you have to hide in this old chair? How did you expect me to find you?” “Things close in,” said Walter Mitty vaguely. “What?” Mrs. Mitty said. “Did you get the what’s-its-name? The puppy biscuit? What’s in that box?” “Overshoes,” said Mitty. “Couldn’t you have put them on in the store?” “I was thinking,” said Walter Mitty. “Does it ever occur to you that I am sometimes thinking?” She looked at him.

“I’m going to take your temperature when I get you home,” she said. 

They went out through the revolving doors that made a faintly derisive whistling sound when you pushed them. It was two blocks to the parking lot. At the drugstore on the corner she said, “Wait here for me. I forgot something. I won’t be a minute.” She was more than a minute. Walter Mitty lighted a cigarette. It began to rain, rain with sleet in it. He stood up against the wall of the drugstore, smoking. . .. He put his shoulders back and his heels together. “To hell with the handkerchief,” said Walter Mitty scornfully. He took one last drag on his cigarette and snapped it away. Then, with that faint, fleeting smile playing about his lips, he faced the firing squad; erect and motionless, proud and disdainful, Walter Mitty the Undefeated, inscrutable to the last.